Department of Philosophy was established in 1908 for Bachelor of Arts courses at Judson College. Professor Dr. St. John was firstly appointed as the head of the department of Philosophy. In 1945, Dr. Hla Bu was appointed as first Myanmar professor of the department of Philosophy at Yangon University and he retired in 1956. After that, the professors mentioned below were appointed as the Head of the Department.
(1) Prof. Mr. Das (1957-61),
(2) Prof. Mr. K.N. Kar (1961-64),
(3) Prof. Dr. Khin Mg Win (1964-75),
(4) Prof. U Pe Aung (1975-77),
(5) Prof. Daw Kyi KyiHla (1978-81),
(6) Prof. U Khin Mg Din (1981-87),
(7) Prof. Daw Thein Si (1988-90),
(8) Prof. Daw Thein Myint (1992-94),
(9) Prof. Dr. Myint Myint Aye (1994-98),
(10) Prof. Dr. Tin TinTun (1998-2005),
(11) Prof. Dr. Thein Zan (2006-08),
(12) Prof. Dr. Tin Win Aung (2009-10),
(13) Prof. Dr. ThetThetNaing (2010-2012) was appointed as head of the department.
At the present, Prof. Dr. Lé Lé Wynn is taking as the head of the Philosophy Department and there are now 12 faculty members in the department.

RESEARCH LIST

Dr. Lé Lé Wynn (Professor & Head)

  1. (March 2017 ) The Role of Japanese Aesthetic Concepts in Environmental Conservation – Book (Sumitomo Foundation Japan-related Research Grant 2014)
  2. (December 2015) The Concept of Space and Time in Japanese Traditional Thought – Yangon University Research Journal. Vol.6, pp.220-228.
  3. (December 2010) The Significant Role of Nagã Symbol in Myanmar Culture – Universities’ Research Journal. Vol.3, pp.113-130
  4. (December 2009) A Philosophical Analysis of the Concept of Impermanence in Japanese Aesthetics – West Yangon University Research Journal. Vol.1, pp.152-165.
  5. (June 2007) A Study of the Dragon Symbol in Japan and Myanmar from the Perspective of Cultural Adaptability – Journal of the Myanmar Academy of Arts and Science. Vol.5, No.6 (B), pp.151-164.
  6. (June 2003 in Japanese) Dragon Symbolism and the Notion of Cosmology in Medieval Japan – ZEAMI _ Art and Culture of Medieval Japan (Special Issue), Shinwa Publishing, Tokyo.Vol.2, pp.174-197.
  7. (March 2003 in Japanese) The Recovery of Artistic Representation – The University of Tokyo.Vol.2, pp.44-59.

Dr. Wai Yan Linn (Lecturer)

  1. (2017) An Aesthetic Analysis on the Myanmar Theory of Rasa (with Reference to U Pon Nya’s Story of the Elephant King Chaddan) – MAAS Vol.15. No.8, pp.21-46
  2. (August 2016) The Essential Role of Aesthetic Attitude in the Process of Aesthetic Experience – URJ Vol.8. No.6 pp.85-98
  3. (July 2014) A Comparative Study of the Concepts of Jen in Confucianism and Metta in Buddhism – KTURJ Vol. 5 No. 1 pp.40-47
  4. (December 2010) The Essential Role of Aesthetic Attitude on Appreciating Aesthetic Objects – WYURJ Vol.2, No. 1 pp.39-46
  5. (December 2009) A Study of Some Myanmar Traditional Poems from the Perspective of Western Aesthetics Theories – WYURJ Vol.1, No.1 pp.152-165
  6. (December 2009) An Analysis of Myanmar Aesthetic Theories – URJ Vol.2, No.9 pp.107-118
  7. (January 2009) An Aesthetical Analysis of U Pon Nya’s Story of King Chadden from the Perspective of the Myanmar Theory of Rasa – Proceeding of West Yangon University Annual Research Seminar pp.73-87

Dr. Thandar Moe (Lecturer)

  1. (December 2016) The Contribution of Taoism to Environmental Conservation – Third Myanmar – Japan International
  2. (2015) Taoism and Environmental Conservation – MURJ
  3. (2014) Confucius’ Ethical Doctrine of “Mean” or Chaung-yung and Environmental Conservation – International Confucian Association (ICA), China
  4. (2012) Non-Egoistic Attitude in the Buddhist Ethical System – MAAS
  5. (2011) The Role of Non-Egoistic Tendencies in Environmental Ethics – URJ Vol.4

Dr. Chaw Kay Khaing (Lecturer)

  1. (2017) The Ethical Foundations of John Locke’s Political Thought – MAAS Vol. XV No. 8 p.69

Dr. Nyi Kyaw Wai (Lecturer)

  1. (December 2016) Vibhajja Vāda as a Method of Analysis in Buddhist Ethics – YURJ Vol.7 No.1

Dr. Duh Bik Cem (Assistant Lecturer)

  1. (December 2015) A Critical Study on the Impact of some Virtues in Christianity – Pyay University Research Journal pp. 31-38
  2. (December 2014) A Critical Study on “Love” in Some Religions – Pyay University Research Journal pp. 63-70
  3. (August 2013) A Study of Confucius’ Social and Moral Cultivation – Pyay University Research Journal

1. Metaphysics
2. Epistemology
3. Value Study
4. Social and Political Philosophy
5. Philosophy of Culture
6. Comparative Philosophy

List of Research conducted by International Grant(From 2013 to recent)

Curriculum

BA First Year (Semester-I)

Foundation Course

မ ၁၀၀၁ (3) မြန်မာစာ
Eng 1001(3) English

Core Courses

Phil 1101 (4) Deductive Logic-I
Phil 1102 (4) Introduction to Western Philosophy-I

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization Student)

AM 1001 (3) Aspects of Myanmar
Hist 1003 (3) World History to 1500 I
Hist 1004 (3) World History 1500-1900 I
Geog 1003 (3) Geography of Southeast Asian Countries
OS 1001 (3) Fundamentals of the Pāli Language
OS 1002 (3) Fundamentals of the Sanskrit Language
Psy 1003 (3) Public Relations
Psy 1004 (3) General Psychology-I
IR 1002 (3) Introduction to International Relations-I
မ ၁၀၀၅ (3) မြန်မာ့ရိုးရာပုံပြင် (၁)
Anth 1001 (3) Introduction to General Anthropology-I
Math 1002 (3) Mathematics-I
LI 1001 (3) Information Sources of Library (Part-I)

* A student will have to take two electives.

Module No. : Phil 1101

Module Name : Deductive Logic-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– Logic is the study of sound reasoning and arguments. It investigates the relationship between propositions. This course covers some basic rules, concepts and skills of logic. Students will learn how to identify deductive and inductive arguments; how to use truth-tables to check deductive validity; how to spot formal and informal fallacies of reasoning etc. These skills have lifelong benefits for improving one’s writing, thinking, critical assessment of ideas and personal autonomy.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. Introduction to Logic
2. A Study of Logical Fallacies
2.1. The Functions of Language
2.2. Material Fallacies
2.3. Formal Fallacies
3. A Study of Propositions
4. A Study of Immediate Inferences
4.1. The Study of Logical Relations
4.2. Distribution of the Terms in Propositions
4.3. The Traditional Square of Opposition
4.4. Establishing logical relations between propositions

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the ability to think carefully and critically and writing skills which is essential for success in any field of work,
  • to obtain the ability to identify common fallacies in arguments,
  • to understand the structure of different kinds of arguments,
  • to recognize and evaluate different kinds of arguments,
  • to apply the principles of logic to ordinary language reasoning,
  • to realize that the proper use of logic is a reasonable way to solve problems.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • apply the ability to think carefully, critically and writing skills which is essential for success in any field of work
  • practice for getting effective communicative skill with other people speak logically
  • upgrade their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
  • reproduce ways of thinking in daily life

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • explain logic is a reasonable way to solve problems
  • avoid daily life using fallacies
  • apply the principles of logic to ordinary language reasoning
  • manipulate the basic skills of 21st century higher education students such as critical thinking, analytical and synthesis, decision-making, problem-solving, self-study, and communication skills. These skills have lifelong benefits for improving one’s writing, thinking, and critical assessment of ideas

REFERENCES

1. Copi, I. M. (2013). Introduction to Logic (14th Edition). New York: The Macmillan Company.
2. Dan Cryan. Introducing Logic. USA: Icon Books.
3. Epstein, Richard L. (2000). The Pocket Guide to Critical Thinking, Wadsworth: Thomson Learning.
4. Kar, K. N. & U Hla Bu. (1993) A Text Book of Modern Formal Logic. Calcutta: Indian Publicity Society.
5. Khin Maung Din, U. (1982) Lecture Guideline on Elementary Logic, Yangon.
6. Layman, C. Stephen. The Power of Logic. (2005). New York: Mc Graw Hill Co, Inc.
7. Westo, Anhony. (2000). A Rulebook for Arguments, Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company.

Module No. : Phil 1102

Module Name : Introduction to Western Philosophy-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims at being an introduction to philosophical thinking in general rather than to provide a full survey of philosophical disciplines, their methods, doctrines and leading ideas. Instead of trying to give a comprehensive account of all possible forms philosophy has assumed throughout its long history we shall zero in on several characteristic examples illustrating how classical and modern thinkers formulate their questions and how they grapple with their issues in contrast to ordinary, religious and scientific consciousness. In addition, the course will provide a preliminary orientation about the notion of philosophical argument, its various forms and the ways argument should be analyzed.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. Introduction to Western Philosophy
2. The development of Early Greek Philosophy
2.1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers
2.2. Socrates and the Sophists
3. A General Study of Plato’s Philosophy
4. A General Study of Aristotle’s Philosophy

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to introduce the crucial role of philosophy in the Western tradition since ancient times
  • to learn the basic characteristics of philosophy subject and how to read and interpret philosophical texts (rightly considered as belonging to the category of the most complex intellectual products),
  • to improve the critical thinking skill for evaluating the strong and weakness of several philosophical theories
  • to obtain the ability to analyse and synthesize the different ideas of philosophers
  • to improve the decision making skill, problem solving skill and communicative skill through the group works or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to develop the sense of interdisciplinary approach through the presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • ask new questions with sense of curiosity
  • differentiate philosophical thought and common belief
  • justify different ideas of western philosophers by their point of views
  • apply the basic skills of 21st century higher education students such as critical thinking, analytical and synthesis, decision-making, problem-solving, self-study, and communication skills by means of conducting the active tutorial and discussion class, group work for presentation and assignment.

– The specific learning outcomes obtain
After this study, students will be able to

  • identify the nature and scope of philosophy,
  • understand the significant features of Western traditional thought and the interdisciplinary linkage between philosophy and other disciplines,
  • point to the strength and weakness of each system of western philosophy
  • discuss philosophies of western philosophers from different perspectives
REFERENCES

1. Armstrong. (1968). An Introduction to Ancient Philosophy. London: Methum Company.
2. Biffle, Christopher. (1999). Landscape of Wisdom. London: Mayfield Publishing Company.
3. Marias, Julian. (1982). History of Philosophy. New York: Dover Publication.
4. Mitchell, Craig Vincent. (2007). Charts of Philosophy and Philosophers. USA: Zodervan.
5. Perelman, C. H. (1965). An Historical Introduction to Philosophical Thinking. New York: Random House.
6. Scruton, Roger. (2001). Kant: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
7. Shand, John. (1993). Philosophy and Philosophers. London: UCL Press.
8. Stace, W. T. (1981). A Critical History of Greek Philosophy. New York: The Macmillan Company.
9. Woodhouse, Mark B. (2000). A Preface to Philosophy. Wadsworth: Thomson Learning.
10. Zaine Ridling, PhD. (2001). Philosophy Then and Now: A Look Back at 26 Centuries of Thought. Part I to IV. Access Foundation.

BA First Year (Semester-II)

Foundation Course

မ ၁၀၀၂ (3) ျမန္မာစာ
Eng 1002 (3) English

Core Courses

Phil 1103 (4) Deductive Logic-II
Phil 1104 (4) Introduction to Western Philosophy-II

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

AM 1002 (3) Aspects of Myanmar
Hist 1007 (3) World History to 1500-II
Hist 1008 (3) World History 1500-1900-II
Geog 1004 (3) Geography of Myanmar
OS 1005 (3) Pāli Language
OS 1006 (3) Sanskrit Language
Psy 1005 (3) Understanding Human Interaction
Psy 1007 (3) General Psychology-II
IR 1004 (3) Introduction to International Relations-II
မ ၁၀၀၈ (3) မြန်မာ့ရိုးရာပုံပြင် (၂)
Anth 1003 (3) Introduction to General Anthropology-II
Math 1004 (3) Mathematics-II
LI 1003 (3) Information Sources of Library (Part-II)

* A student will have to take two electives (one elective and AM 1002) from among those offered.

Module No. : Phil 1103

Module Name : Deductive Logic-II

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– Deductive logic is concerned with valid reasoning in order to apply and utilize this knowledge correctly to new cases which we later come across in experience. Deductive argument is using representational devices, General Rules, Venn’s Diagram, different kinds of Mixed Syllogism and Poly- Syllogism can apply deductive logic as a guide to everyday thinking and everyday life. These rules are determined whether or not a particular deductive argument is valid. This course covers some basic rules, concepts and skills of logic. These skills have lifelong benefits for improving one’s writing, thinking, critical assessment of ideas and personal autonomy.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
A Study of Mediate Inferences
1. The Categorical Syllogism
1.1. The Nature and General Rules of Categorical Syllogisms
1.2. Testing the Validity of Categorical Syllogism
1.3. Some other rules and their proofs.
2. The Mixed Syllogism
3. A Study of Mediate Inference, A Study of Poly-syllogisms, Sorities, Epicherima, Enthymemes
4. The Utility of Deductive Logic for daily life (Problem solving)

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to give the knowledge of identifying the different kinds of arguments in the course of our daily life
  • to identify validity and invalidity of arguments
  • to test the validity of categorical syllogisms by means of Venn’s Diagram, different kinds of Mixed Syllogism, enthymematic arguments and Poly- Syllogism
  • to reveal the rules and principles which can guide us to decide correct forms of inferences
  • to help strengthen one’s problem-solving abilities is the logical puzzles
  • to realize that the proper use of deductive logic as a guide to everyday thinking
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • differentiate consistent argumentation
  • share deductive logic as a guide to everyday thinking
  • discuss their own ideas in line with logical sequence
  • practice for getting effective communicative skill with other people speak logically
  • manipulate their critical skills and analytical skills

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • discuss their own ideas in line with logical sequence with others
  • justify correct forms of inferences
  • ask new questions with sense of curiosity whatever they experience the matter of logic in daily life
  • realize strengthen one’s problem-solving abilities is the logical puzzles
REFERENCES

1. Copi, I. M. (2013) Introduction to Logic (14th Edition). New York: The Macmillan Company.
2. Dan Cryan. Introducing Logic. USA: Icon Books.
3. Epstein, Richard L. (2000). The Pocket Guide to Critical Thinking. Wadsworth: Thomson Learning.
4. Kar, K. N. and U Hla Bu. (1993) A Text Book of Modern Formal Logic. Calcutta: Indian Publicity Society.
5. Khin Maung Din, U. (1982) Lecture Guideline on Elementary Logic. Yangon: Department of Philosophy, University of Yangon.
6. Layman, C. Stephen. The Power of Logic. (2005). New York: Mc Graw Hill Co, Inc.
7. Westo, Anhony. (2000). A Rulebook for Arguments. Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company.

Module No. : Phil 1104

Module Name : Introduction to Western Philosophy-II

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims at being an introduction to medieval and modern philosophical thinking in general. This course demonstrate understanding of the content and significance of selected viewed of Rationalism, Empiricism and German Idealism. In addition, the course will provide a preliminary orientation about the arguments and conclusions of medieval and modern philosophers, with some reference to the contemporary significance of those arguments and conclusions.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. A Study of Medieval Philosophy
2. A Study of Modern Philosophy
2.1. Rationalism Vs Empiricism
2.1.1. René Descartes
2.1.2. Baruch Spinoza
2.1.3. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
2.1.4. Francis Bacon
2.1.5. John Locke
2.1.6. George Berkeley
2.1.7. David Hume
2.2. German Idealism
2.2.1. Immanuel Kant
2.2.2. Johann Gottlieb Fichte
2.2.3. Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling
2.2.4. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to become familiar with major philosophical problems and the methods of dealing them,
  • to learn how to read and interpret philosophical texts (rightly considered as belonging to the category of the most complex intellectual products),
  • to improve the critical thinking skill for evaluating the strong and weakness of several philosophical theories
  • to obtain the ability to analyse and synthesize the different ideas of philosophers
  • to present and defend on philosophical and interpretative questions arising from engagement with medieval and modern philosophers’ ideas
  • to improve the sense of interdisciplinary approach through the presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • synthesize between the development of philosophy and the development of society
  • differentiate their knowledge about philosophical theories and share to other clearly
  • change attitudes in world outlook
  • to develop the basic skills of 21st century higher education students such as critical thinking, analytical and synthesis, decision-making, problem-solving, self-study, and communication skills by means of conducting the active tutorial and discussion class, group work for presentation and assignment.

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • summarize the development of western intellectual tradition
  • discuss philosophies of western philosophers from different perspectives
  • arrange their ideas consistently
  • respond others opinion with facts and figures
REFERENCES

1. Armstrong. (1968). An Introduction to Ancient Philosophy. London: Methum Company.
2. Biffle, Christopher. (1999). Landscape of Wisdom. London: Mayfield Publishing Company.
3. Marias, Julian. (1982). History of Philosophy. New York: Dover Publication.
4. Mitchell, Craig Vincent. (2007). Charts of Philosophy and Philosophers. USA: Zodervan.
5. Perelman, C. H. (1965). An Historical Introduction to Philosophical Thinking. New York: Random House.
6. Scruton, Roger. (2001). Kant: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
7. Shand, John. (1993). Philosophy and Philosophers. London: UCL Press.
8. Stace, W. T. (1981). A Critical History of Greek Philosophy. New York: The Macmillan Company.
9. Woodhouse, Mark B. (2000). A Preface to Philosophy. Wadsworth: Thomson Learning.
10. Zaine Ridling, PhD. (2001). Philosophy Then and Now: A Look Back at 26 Centuries of Thought. Part I to IV. Access Foundation (eBook).

BA Second Year (Semester I)

Foundation Course

Eng 2001 (3) English

Core Courses

Phil 2101 (4) Eastern Philosophy-I
Phil 2102 (4) Inductive Logic-I
Phil 2103 (4) Twentieth Century Western Philosophy-I

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization Student)

Hist 2002 (3) World History 1900 to Present-I
Geog 2005 (3) Political Geography-I
OS 2001 (3) Pāli Language-I
OS 2003 (3) Pāli Literature (Prose)
Psy 2001 (3) Language and Thought
Psy 2002 (3) The Development of Self-Concept
Eng 2003 (3) Developing Communicative Skills-I
Math 2002 (3) Mathematics-I
LI 2001 (3) Effective Use of Information Centre
r 2004 (3) jrefrmtrsdK;orD;pmqdkrsm;ESifh4if;wdkU\pmrsm; (1)
Phil 2104 (3) The Cultural and Ethical Aspects of Environmental Conservation-I

* A student will have to take two electives.

Module No. : Phil 2101

Module Name : Eastern Philosophy-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course is a general and thematic introduction to India’s major philosophical traditions. Throughout the course, there will be discussed the differences among Indian philosophical schools and examine three streams of philosophical dissent from the orthodox tradition in the heterodox traditions of Carvaka, Jainism, and Buddhism. From then, move on to examine the development of the orthodox systems, focusing on the Nyaya Vaishesika systems, the Samkhya Yoga, the Mimamsa System and the Vedanta System.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
2. The Genesis of Indian Philosophy
2.1. The General Characteristic of Indian Philosophy
2.2. The Stages and Development of Indian Philosophy
3. A General Survey of Indian Philosophical Schools
3.1. The Heterodox Schools
3.2. The Orthodox Schools

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to understand the genesis of Indian philosophy
  • to achieve a direct view of something require more than logical reasoning; it also involves perception and intuition
  • to improve the understanding about wisdom of the East is philosophy and psychology and social and religion all rolled in one
  • It can also challenging as any in the history of Western thought
  • to examine the basic teaching of six schools in Indian philosophy
  • to explore some keys features of Indian Ethical, Ontological and Epistemological views
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • classify the Indian philosophical schools with their respective characteristics
  • distinguish from the Orthodox schools to Non-Orthodox
  • describe Ethics, Religion and Philosophy are mixed in Indian culture
  • analyze primary and secondary Eastern philosophical systems
  • point out the significant feature of each school

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • examine the key concepts in Indian Philosophy
  • indicate the general characteristics of Indian Philosophy
  • judge Indian Philosophy is not simply a matter of logic or speculation, but is also concerned with experience and intuition
  • discuss studying Eastern Philosophy is not, for someone brought up in the West, simply a matter of looking with detached interest at ideas that come from other culture
REFERENCES

1. Datta & Chatterjee. (1964). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy. Calcutta: University of Calcutta Press.
2. Hiriyana, M. (1949). The Essentials of Indian Philosophy. London: Unwin Brothers Ltd.
3. Hiriyanna, M. (1963). The Essentials of Indian Philosophy. Bombay: Blackie and Son Publishers Pvt. Ltd..
4. Radhakrishnan, Sir. (1982). History of Philosophy Eastern & Western. London: Allen & Unwin Ltd.

Module No. : Phil 2102

Module Name : Inductive Logic-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims at being an introduction to the nature of inductive reasoning. Then it can be discussed the process subsidiary to induction, basic principles of induction, and different kinds of induction. Throughout the course, it will be continue to discuss criteria of induction and utility of inductive logic in daily life.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. A Study of the Nature of Induction
2. Some Subsidiary Processes of Induction
3. Basic Principles of Induction
4. Different Kinds of Induction
5. Some New Theories of Induction (The modern view – Five kinds of induction)
6. Evaluation of Inductive Reasoning
7. Criteria for causal determination
8. The utility of inductive logic for daily life. (For Student -centred Approach)

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to understand about inductive reasoning and its value in daily life as well as professional
  • to learn the notion of inductive reasoning and the role of its application can be found out in daily life’s experience of the people whether they accept it or not
  • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
  • to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • ask the new questions well with a sense of curiosity whatever they experience in daily life and how to respond the questions comprehensively
  • clearly explain their own assumptions
  • improve the skills of critical thinking, analytical approach, problem solving, multi-dimensional view, making inferences and interpretations
  • select what methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • understand the distinction between deductive arguments from inductive arguments
  • draw the conclusion that is reasonable based on the evidences
  • identify some basic intuitions about what counts as “good” or “acceptable” reasoning
  • develop the capacity for applying philosophical knowledge to social issues
  • create generalizations and predictions for the problems
REFERENCES

1. Brennan, J. G. (1963). A Handbook of Logic. New York: Harper and Row.
2. Copi, I. M. (1984). Introduction to Logic (Sixth Edition). New York: The Macmillan Company.
3. Dan Cryan. Introducing Logic. USA: Icon Books.
4. Kar, K. N. and U Hla Bu, (1993). A Text Book of Modern Formal Logic. Calcutta: Indian Publicity Society.
5. Khin Maung Din, U. (1982). Lecture Guideline on Elementary Logic. Yangon.
6. Layman, C. Stephen. (2005). The Power of Logic. New York: Mc Graw Hill Co, Inc.

Module No. : Phil 2103

Module Name : Twentieth Century Western Philosophy-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to introduce the Twentieth Century philosophy in the light of the historical development and its general characteristics. The study based on some philosophical dimensions disclosed by significant philosophers such as Ontology and Epistemology as the most primary branches and the new trends of thought namely pragmatism, logical positivism and realism.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. The Development of Twentieth Century Philosophy and its General Characteristics
2. A Study of Bergson’s Ontology and Epistemology
3. A Study of the Pragmatism
4. A Study of Logical Positivism
5. A Study of Realism

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the understanding about twentieth century western philosophy as its applied value in daily life as well as professional.
  • to become familiar with major figures, movements, concepts, theories and debates in twentieth century western philosophy .
  • to learn knowledge of the fundamental questions about truths, human existence and ultimate reality and analyze philosophical truth claims.
  • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening.
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom .
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • memorize the development of Twentieth Century Western philosophy and identify the nature and scope of western culture
  • apply knowledge of philosophical perspectives, logic, and critical reasoning to develop his or her own opinions regarding philosophical problems and issues and also manipulate the specific issues of daily life
  • articulate and criticize the values, principles and assumptions on which individual and social decisions rest.
  • synthesize the different views of other scholars to draw the effective conclusion using literature survey
  • select what methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course and organize the research frame

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • distinguish the different between absolute truth and relative truth, what are the good or bad action and what are the right and wrong action on social development
  • indicate the role of western thought in culture and its development
  • understand and be able to discuss major philosophical problems in the Western Tradition
  • share their knowledge and ideas to the public by means of research paper or publication
  • show their ideas with the suitable tools and devices which are needed to make presentation of the functions of western philosophy
REFERENCES

1. Datta, M. D. (1972). The Chief Currents of Contemporary Philosophy. Calcutta: University of Calcutta Press.
2. Grayling, A. C. (2002). Russell: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
3. Mitchell, Craig Vincent. (2007). Charts of Philosophy and Philosophers. USA: Zodervan.
4. Perelman, C. H. (1965). An Historical Introduction to Philosophical Thinking. New York: Random House.
5. Russell, Bertrand. (1966). Wisdom of the West. New York: A Fawcett Publication Inc.
6. Shand, John. (1993). Philosophy and Philosophers, London: UCL Press.
7. Thilly, Frank. (1965). A History of philosophy. Allahabad: Indian University Press.
8. Velasquez, Manuel. (2005). Philosophy. New York: Thomson, Wadsworth.
9. Zaine Ridling, PhD. (2001). Philosophy Then and Now: A Look Back at 26 Centuries of Thought, Part I to IV. Access Foundation. (E book)

Module No. : Phil 2104 (Elective)

Module Name : The Cultural and Ethical Aspects of Environmental Conservation -I

TOTAL HOURS : (60) Hours

Lecture : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to provide ethical justification and moral motivation for the cause of global environmental protection. In addition, the course will provide an orientation about the notion of environmental conservation, environmental ethics which examines the moral basis of environmental responsibility. This course can contribute to become awareness of environmental responsibility.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
• What is Environmental Conservation
• Definition of Key Terms e
• The need for an ethics of environmental conservation
• Environmental Ethics as a topic of Applied Ethics
• Contribution of Ethics

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to understand about environmental conservation, ecosystem and ecology.
  • to become familiar with the terms of environment and environmental ethics
  • to recognize and resolve the awareness and moral guideline of Environmental Conservation as the primary task of human being
  • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • propose new perspective to control and prevent the deterioration of natural environment
  • discuss the present situations in global environment
  • organize the practical research from environmental problems
  • integrate their new perspective to present new ideas in environmental conservation

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • identify the nature and scope of environment
  • explain the survival of the human species in the face of environmental deterioration
  • demonstrate knowledge of existing organizations and programs in environmental problems
  • initiate their new approaches to study sustainable development from philosophical point of view
REFERENCES

1. Attfield, Robin (1991). The Ethics of Environmental Concern (2nd Edition). Athens & London: The University of Georgia Press.
2. Engel, J . Ronald. (1993). Ethics of Environment and Development. London: Belhaven Press.
3. Garvey, James. (2008). The Ethics of Climate Change. London: Continuum International Publishing Group.
4. Kyi Kyi Hla, Daw. (2010). The Ethics of Environmental Conservation. Yangon: Myanmar Academy of Arts and Science.
5. Ministry of Foreign Affairs. (2009) Basic Diplomatic Skills (Lecture Notes). Yangon: Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
6. Taylor, Paul W. (1986). Respect for Nature_A Theory of Environmental Ethics_. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
7. UNESCO. (2004). Ethics in Asia-Pacific. Bangkok: UNESCO.

BA Second Year (Semester II)

Foundation Course

Eng 2002 (3) English

Core Courses

Phil 2106 (4) Eastern Philosophy-II
Phil 2107 (4) Inductive Logic-II
Phil 2108 (4) Twentieth Century Western Philosophy-II

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

Hist 2005 (3) World History 1900 to Present-II
Geog 2006 (3) Political Geography-II
OS 2006 (3) Pāli Language-II
OS 2008 (3) Pāli Literature (Poetry)
Psy 2004 (3) Stress and Stress Management
Psy 2005 (3) Individual, Social and Cultural Diversity in Pro and Anti-Social Behavior
Eng 2004 (3) Developing Communicative Skills-II
Math 2005 (3) Mathematics-II
LI 2003 (3) Effective Use of Information Centre
r 2008(3) jrefrmtrsdK;orD;pmqdkrsm;ESifh4if;wdkY\pmrsm; (2)
Phil 2109 (3) The Cultural and Ethical Aspects of Environmental Conservation-II

* A student will have to take two electives.

Module No. : Phil 2106

Module Name : Eastern Philosophy-II

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course is an introduction to the Chinese philosophy, concerning on the work of such major thinkers as Confucius, Mencius, Hsun Tzu, Mohism, Taoism, Neo-Confucianism and Neo-Taoism. Topics of discussion include the general characteristics of Chinese philosophy, human nature and the human condition, the meaning and value of life, and the nature of the good life.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy
2. The Genesis of Chinese Philosophy
3. The General Characteristic of Chinese Philosophies
4. A General Survey of Chinese Philosophy

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to achieve a direct views of All-embracing Love, Yin-Yang and Tao
  • to improve the understanding about wisdom of the East
  • It can also challenging as any in the history of Western thought
  • It can examine the basic teaching of Confucianism and Taoism in Chinese philosophy
  • It can explore some keys features of Chinese Cosmological, Social, Political, Legal and Human Nature
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • interpret different perspectives on traditional Chinese philosophical issues
  • distinguish from the views of human nature in Chinese Philosophy
  • describe Social, Political and Philosophy are mixed in Chinese culture
  • develop a deeper appreciation for Western perspectives through the method of comparison with Chinese philosophy
  • use the logical and critical thinking methods of philosophy to analyze and evaluate the ways in which Eastern philosophers attempt to solve the problems of philosophy

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • demonstrate the key concepts in Chinese Philosophy,
  • identify the major periods and the major figures in the history of Chinese philosophy,
  • analyze the basic problems of Eastern philosophy in the fields of metaphysics, axiology, and epistemology,
  • share actively in discussions of philosophical ideas and issues,
  • develop and refine the ability to offer criticism of philosophical positions, and will develop the ability to form their own educated positions on philosophical issues.
REFERENCES

1. Chai, C. & W. Chai. (1982). The Stories of Chinese Philosophy. New York: Washington Square Press.
2. Chan, Wing-Tsit. (1963). A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
3. Creel, H. G. (1960). Chinese Thought from Confucius to Mao Tse-tung. Chicago: New American Library.
4. Fung Yu-Lan. (1981). A Short History of Chinese Philosophy. New York: The Free Press.
5. Theodore de Bary, William. (1980). Sources of Chinese Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press.
6. Xu Yuanxiang. (2007). Confucius: A Philosopher for the Ages. Beijing: China International Press.
7. Xu Yuanxiang. (2007). Lao Tzu: The Eternal Tao Te Ching. Beijing: China International Press.
8. Xu Yuanxiang. (2007). Sun Tzu: The Ultimate Master of War. Beijing: China International Press.

Module No. : Phil 2107

Module Name : Inductive Logic-II

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims at being an introduction to the general study of Mill’s method, the nature of inference in science, how to falsified some hypothesis by giving negative instances, some characteristics of scientific methodology and some philosophers’ conception on scientific method.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. An Evaluation of Mill’s Method of Causal Determination
2. The Nature of Inference in Science
3. A Study of Scientific Methodology
4. Views Regarding Scientific Methodology

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to verify hypotheses and to falsify instances with giving new negative instances and its value in daily life as well as professional
  • to develop the notion that they have been able to extent their knowledge obtained from their sense organs through thinking and reasoning
  • to learn some characteristics of scientific methodology and some philosophers’ view of inductive reasoning and appreciate the role of induction and to know its value from the multidisciplinary perspective
  • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
  • to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • promote their reasoning skills, logical thinking skills, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills
  • become confidence in every reasoning and argumentation
  • improve their professional and personal skills lifelong
  • have the opportunity to work with a wide range of probabilities
  • construct correct reasoning and arrange good presentation with effective power point slides

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • develop their critical, analytical and problem solving skills
  • evaluate evidences and draw inferences from that evidences
  • draw conclusion that is reasonable based on the evidences
  • understand the common patterns of scientific reasoning
  • improve the knowledge and skills of research method which is a requirement in academic studies
REFERENCES

1. Bernnan, J. G. (1963). A Handbook of Logic. New York: Harper & Row.
2. Copi, I. M. (1982). Symbolic Logic. Fifth Edition, London: The Macmillan Co.
3. Faris, J. A. (1964). Quantification Theories. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
4. Gustav, Bergman. (1957). Philosophy of Science. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.
5. Kar, K. N. and U Hla Bu. (1963). A Text Book of Modern Formal Logic. Third Edition. Rangoon: Rangoon University Press.
6. Layman, C. Stephen. (2005). The Power of Logic. New York: Mc Graw Hill Co, Inc.
7. Prior, A. N. (1963). Formal Logic. London : Oxford University Press.
8. Purtill, R. L. (1971). Logic for Philosophers. New York: Harper & Row.
9. Quine, W. V. O. (1962). Method of Logic. Second Edition. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
10. Russell, Bertrand. (1948). Human Knowledge. New York: Siman and Schuster.
11. Tarski, A. (1972). Introduction to Logic and to the Methodology of Educative Science. London: Oxford University Press.

Module No. : Phil 2108

Module Name : Twentieth Century Western Philosophy-II

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims at begin the development of analytical philosophy and its general characteristics, the nature of existentialism, idealism and contemporary philosophy, and postmodern thought and some significant philosophers’ views on existentialism, contemporary idealism and postmodern thought from the philosophical perspective. In addition, the course will provide an orientation about the notion of analytical philosophy and significant notions and concepts in twentieth century western philosophy. It can also be familiar students with major figures and movements in the history of western philosophy; familiar with central concepts, topics, theories, and debates and current developments in western philosophy.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. A Study of Analytical Philosophy
2. A Study of Existentialism
3. A Study of Contemporary Western Idealism
4. A Study of Later Twentieth Century philosophy
5. An Evaluation of Contemporary Philosophy
6. Postmodern Thought

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the understanding about twentieth century western philosophy as its applied value in daily life as well as professional.
  • to become familiar with major figures, movements, concepts, theories and debates in twentieth century western philosophy .
  • to learn knowledge of the fundamental questions about truths, human existence and ultimate reality and analyze philosophical truth claims
  • to learn knowledge about fundamental concepts such as self and subjectivity; mind and consciousness; alienation, anxiety, and authenticity, freedom and determinism, gender, race, nationality, and social justice
  • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening.
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom .
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • memorize the development of Twentieth Century Western philosophy and Postmodern Thought
  • locate the existence of human nature and identify the nature and role of man in human culture
  • criticize philosophical methods, assumptions, and principles of the different views of the scholars to analyze philosophical ideas and positions including contemporary problems and issues
  • choose the necessary and meaningful questions to conduct their research or study and select what methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course by using literature survey
  • discuss their own ideas in line with logical sequence and organize the research frame logically

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • indicate the intimate relationship between man and nature and what are the good or bad on social and political development
  • distinguish the difference of western philosophers in culture and its development
  • explain successfully at least three of the following concepts: self and subjectivity; mind and consciousness; alienation, anxiety, and authenticity, freedom and determinism, gender, race, nationality, and social justice.
  • distinguish the role of language, meaning, and truth in philosophical inquiry and develop a philosophical analysis of a contemporary cultural, political, religious, or scientific problem.
  • ask new questions with sense of curiosity whatever they have been used experience and reason in daily life and sketch the key steps of sharing ideas in designing the presentation
REFERENCES

1. Anderson, W.T. (1995). The Fortana Postmodernism Reader. London: Fontana Press.
2. Butler, Christopher. (2002). Postmodernism: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
3. Datta, M. D. (1982). The Chief Currents of Contemporary Philosophy. Calcutta: Calcutta University Press.
4. McCallum, Dennis. (1996). The Death of Truth. USA: Bethany House Publishers.
5. Mitchell, Craig Vincent. (2007). Charts of Philosophy and Philosophers. USA: Zodervan.
6. Perelman, C. H. (1965). An Historical Introduction to Philosophical Thinking. New York: Random House.
7. Ridling, Zaine. PhD. (2001). Philosophy Then and Now: A Look Back at 26 Centuries of Thought, Part I to IV. Access Foundation, (eBook).
8. Shand, John. (1993). Philosophy and Philosophers. London: UCL Press.
9. Thilly, Frank. (1965). A History of Philosophy. Allahabad : Indian University Press.
10. Velasquez, Manuel. (2005). Philosophy. US: Thomson Wadsworth.

Module No. : Phil 2109

Module Name : The Cultural and Ethical Aspects of Environmental Conservation -II

TOTAL HOURS : (60) Hours

Lecture : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to provide a unique set of moral values and rules from world religions and ancient cultural views to guide human beings in their relationship with the environment. In addition, the course will provide an orientation about the notions of religion, it can be a powerful source for environmental conservation and protection and world religions, each in their own way, offer a unique set of moral values and rules to guide human beings in their relationship with the environment.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
• Ethical Views on Environmental Conservation and Sustainable Development (Hindu Views)
• Ethical Views of Nature of Taoism
• Ethical Views on Environmental Conservation and Sustainable Development (Myanmar views)

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the understanding about religion which can evoke a kind of awareness in persons that is different from scientific or technological reasoning
  • to understand the terms of moral values in world religion
  • to learn how to appreciate and interpret the role of religion which is careful to observe moral teaching regarding the treatment of Nature
  • to upgrade their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
  • to develop the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • to understand the role of cultural and ethical aspects in environmental conservation
  • to improve human responsibility to environmental conservation from each respective culture
  • organize the practical environmental research from religious awareness
  • make their new perspective to present new ideas in environmental conservation

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • identify the nature of environment and the role of moral values in environmental conservation
  • explain the ethics of environmental conservation and sustainable development as a social and moral guide in the human world
  • apply knowledge and values of eastern cultural tradition in solving environmental problems
  • initiate their new approaches to study sustainable development from philosophical point of view
REFERENCES

1. Engel, J . Ronald. (1993). Ethics of Environment and Development. London: Belhaven Press.
2. Garvey, James. (2008) The Ethics of Climate Change. London: Continuum International Publishing Group.
3. Kyi Kyi Hla, Daw. (2010). The Ethics of Environmental Conservation. Yangon: Myanmar Academy of Arts and Science.
4. Ministry of Foreign Affairs. (2009) Basic Diplomatic Skills (Lecture Notes). Yangon: Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
5. Paul W. Taylor (1986). Respect for Nature_A Theory of Environmental Ethics_. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
6. Robin Attfield (1991). The Ethics of Environmental Concern (2nd Edition). Athens & London: The University of Georgia Press.
7. UNESCO. (2004). Ethics in Asia-Pacific. Bangkok: UNESCO.

BA Third Year (Semester-I)

Eng 3001 – English                        (Foundation)

Phil 3101 – Advanced Logic-I           (Core)

Phil 3102 – Western Aesthetics       (Core)

Phil 3103 – Philosophy of History-I           (Core)

Phil 3104 – Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-I         (Core)

*Elective –  Student’s Choice (from Philosophy specialization)    (Elective)

 

BA Third Year (Semester-II)

Eng 3002 –  English             (Foundation)

Phil 3107  – Advanced Logic-II             (Core)

Phil 3108 – Eastern Aesthetics             (Core)

Phil 3109 –  Philosophy of History-II        (Core)

Phil 3110  – Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-II        (Core)

*Elective Student’s Choice (from Philosophy specialization)    (Elective)

BA Honours First Year(Semester I)

Foundation Course

Eng 3001 (3) English

Core Courses

Phil 3201 (4) Western Aesthetics
Phil 3202 (4) Advanced Logic-I
Phil 3203 (4) Philosophy of History-I
Phil 3204 (4) Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-I

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

Phil 3206 (3) Ethics-I (Theoretical Ethics)

Module No. : Phil 3201

Module Name : Western Aesthetics

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims at begin the nature and scope of aesthetics, difference between art and aesthetics, general characteristics of aesthetics, different kinds of art criticism and the introduction to some aesthetic movements and some philosophers’ view on aesthetics of western traditions in classical period, in transitional period, and in modern period from the philosophical perspective. In addition, the course will provide an orientation about the notion of aesthetics and its applied values in not only in the sphere of art works, it can be found out or appreciate in daily life’s experience of the people through comparison between the Western aesthetic theories and those of the East.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. The Nature of Aesthetics
1.1. The definition of Aesthetics
1.2. The history of Aesthetics
1.3. Art and Aesthetics
1.4. Aesthetics and Art Criticism
2. Different Kinds of Art Criticism
3. Art and Society (Western Theories)
4. A Critical Study of Western Aesthetics
4.1. The Classical Period
4.2. The Transitional Period
4.3. The Modern Period

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the understanding about western aesthetics as a significant philosophical study as its applied value in daily life as well as professional
  • to become familiar with the aesthetic movements and aesthetic concepts in the western traditions
  • to learn how to appreciate and interpret the role of aesthetics in society or several areas from the multidisciplinary perspective
  • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • draw out meaning from given data or statements, generate and evaluate arguments and make their own judgement
  • study collaboratively with each other through group practices and competitions for getting effective communicative skill
  • synthesize the different views of other scholars to draw the effective conclusion and manipulate self-study skills
  • select what methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course and trace the former theories by using online or off line literature survey
  • organize the research frame logically and arrange good presentation with effective power point slides

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • indicate the intimate relationship between art and morality, art and society and interpret the different theories of art and artistic movements in western traditions
  • judge what is authentic or inauthentic art by means of its genuine aesthetic value
  • utilize their knowledge of value judgment in their daily lives
  • reconstruct a new perspective to recommend the further studies about axiological studies
  • show their ideas with the suitable tools and devices which are needed to make presentation of the value theories in line with logical sequence with others.
REFERENCES

1. Aldrich, V. C. (1963). Philosophy of Art. Englewood Cliff: Prentice Hall, Inc.
2. Beardsley, M.E. (1966). Aesthetics from Classical Greece to the Present. New York: The Macmillan Company.
3. Commaraswamy, A. C. (1948). The Dance of Shivas. Calcutta, Asia Publishing House, Bombay.
4. Fisher, E. (1959). The Necessity of Art. London, Penguin Book Ltd.
5. Graham, Gordon. (2000). Philosophy of The Arts_An Introduction to Aesthetics_(2nd Edition). London & New York: Routledge.
6. Ridling, Zaine PhD. (2001). Philosophy Then and Now: A Look Back at 26 Centuries of Thought , Part III & IV. Access Foundation.
7. Stolnitz, J. (1981). Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art Criticism. New York, Houghton Mifflin Company.
8. နိုင်ဇော်။ (၂၀၁၀)။ အနုပညာ၏သရဖူကိုသွန်းလုပ်ခြင်း။ ရန်ကုန်၊ သီရိဝစ္ဆစာပေ။

Module No. : Phil 3202

Module Name : Advanced Logic-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course assumes to familiar with symbolic logic, including the meanings of the logical constants, translation from English into logical language, truth tables and a deductive proof system. The special symbols of logic are much better adapted than ordinary language to the actual process of inferences. The use of special technical symbols can also make the nature of deductive inference clear. This course covers some basic rules, concepts and skills of logic. Students will learn how to identify deductive arguments; how to use truth-tables, Polish, Quine methods and formal proof to check deductive validity. These skills have lifelong benefits for improving one’s writing, thinking, critical assessment of ideas and personal autonomy.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. A Brief History of Logic
2. Truth Functional Logic
2.1. Simple and Compound Statements
2.2. The Nature of Implication
2.3. Argument Forms and Truth Tables
2.4. Truth-value Analyses
2.5. Tautologies, Contradictions and Contingencies
2.6. Material Equivalences
2.7. Testing Implications and Equivalences by Quine’s Method
3. The method of deduction
3.1. Formal Proof of validity
3.2. Incompleteness of the Nineteen Rules
3.3. The Rules of Conditional Proof
3.4. The Rule of Indirect Proof
3.5. Proof of Tautologies
3.6. Proving Invalidity
3.7. Shorter Truth Table Technique (Reductio ad Absurdum Method)
3.8. The Strengthened Rule of Conditional Proof

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to know the meaning and definition of symbolic logic and its usefulness
  • to obtain the ability to identify validity and invalidity of an argument containing truth functionally compound statements by the some methods
  • to apply the principles for Formal Proof of Validity, Conditional Proof and Indirect Proof.
  • to realize that the proper use of logic is a reasonable way to solve problems
  • to help students cover the most recent developments in contemporary logic and learn modal and philosophical logics as well as alternative logical systems.
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • solve the linguistic difficulties in sciences by using technical and special symbolisms
  • improve the ability to think carefully and critically and writing skills which is essential for success in any field of work
  • discuss logical analyses of the relations of philosophical concepts in specific areas
  • develop self-study skills and critical thinking skill

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • apply the principles of logic to ordinary language reasoning
  • realize that the proper use of logic is a reasonable way to solve problems
  • share the basic skills of 21st century higher education students such as critical thinking, analytical and synthesis, decision-making, problem-solving, self-study, and communication skills
  • reconstruct lifelong benefits for improving one’s writing, thinking, and critical assessment of ideas
  • challenge their own ideas and to develop self-understanding in the context of a diverse range of ideas which inform contemporary controversies and social conflict.

Module No. : Phil 3203

Module Name : Philosophy of History-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to introduce the nature of philosophy of history, the difference between the historical knowledge and scientific knowledge, the idealist account of explanation in history, the nature of the correspondence and coherence theory and its role in history, and nineteenth century historical theories from some philosophers’ point of view.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. The Nature of Philosophy of History
2. A Philosophical Study of Historical Problems
3. A study of some nineteenth century historical theories
3.1. Kant’s conception of history
3.2. Herder’s conception of history

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to cultivate their knowledge of philosophical history
  • to become general understanding of the philosophy of history and a specific understanding of some portion of that history
  • to learn how to appreciate and interpret the role of philosophy of history from the multidisciplinary perspective
  • to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • Understand philosophy of history, including knowing their nature, main ideas and theories
  • demonstrate the philosophical study of historical problems
  • discuss how several major philosophers have understood history and how they differently portray history
  • reflect critically on the adequacy of historians’ explanations both new perspective and those of others
  • improve team work and competitions for getting effective communicative skill by doing presentation
The specific learning outcomes

After this study, students will be able to

  • understand recent developments in the philosophy of history and speak knowledgeably about them.
  • indicate philosophical views or theory more than one perspective
  • share their knowledge and ideas to the others effectively
  • distinguish philosophical accounts of problem from other kinds of theoretical explanations
  • improve writing philosophical essays with reasonable arguments
REFERENCES

1. Carr, E. H. (1964). What is History. London: Cox and Warnan Ltd.
2. Collingwood, R. G. (1965). Essays in Philosophy of History. Texas: University of Texas Press.
3. Khaler, E. (1968). The Meaning of History (Meridian Book). New York: World Pub. Co.
4. Popper, K. R. (1969). The Poverty of Historicism, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
5. Walsh, W. H. (1967). An Introduction to Philosophy of History. London, Hutchinson University Library.

Module No. : Phil 3204

Module Name : Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to introduce salient features of Myanmar culture and philosophical thought. This course will provide an overview of Myanmar thought on reality, knowledge, and morality. In this course, some Myanmar proverbs and categories of dialectic method indicates a right way for the achievement of success in human’s thoughts and actions. In addition, Myanmar proverbs synthesize the opposites not to go the extremes and to have right actions in all deeds. The philosophical outlooks can be reduced from Myanmar proverbs.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. Nature and Definition of Myanmar Culture
2. Nature of Myanmar Way of Thinking
3. Philosophical impact on Myanmar Traditional Festival
4. Myanmar Thought on Reality
5. Myanmar Thought on Knowledge
6. Myanmar Thought on Morality
7. Myanmar Proverbs and Categories of Dialectic Method

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to give Myanmar thought on reality, knowledge and morality
  • to learn Myanmar thought based on rich cultural traditions of Myanmar
  • to understand the concept of Mind, Matter in Myanmar traditional thought
  • to know the pairs of the categories of Dialectic Method in Myanmar proverbs
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • discuss salient features of Myanmar culture and philosophical thought
  • identify the nature and scope of Myanmar traditional thought
  • manipulate self-study skills, decision making skills, analytical skills and synthetic skills
  • make fair-minded or positive critique

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • understand significant concepts in Myanmar traditional thought
  • apply the crucial role of dialectical method in studying Myanmar culture and ways of thinking
  • to propose new perspectives on Myanmar culture to make recommendation to other scholars in the same area of study
  • discuss their own ideas in line with logical sequence with others
REFERENCES

1. Burma Piṭaka Association. (1987). Digha Nikãya-Long Discourses of the Buddha. Tokyo: Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai (Buddhist Promoting Foundation) (Reproduced and co-distributed).
2. K. (2006). Myanmar Culture. Yangon: Today Publishing.
3. Khin Myo Chit. (1995). Colorful Myanmar. Yangon: Parami Sarpay.
4. Hla Pe, Dr. (1962). Myanmar Proverbs. London: John Murray.
5. Htin Aung, Dr. (1962). Folk Element in Myanmar Buddhism. London: Oxford University Press.
6. Ledi Sayadaw. (1965). Manual of Buddhism. Rangoon: Buddha Sasana Council.
7. Nakamura, Hajime. (1964). Ways of Thinking of Eastern People. Honolulu: East-West Center Press.
8. Shwe Zan Aung. (1956). Compendium of Philosophy. London: Luzac & Co Ltd.
9. Taw Sein Ko. (1913). Burmese Sketches. Rangoon: British Burma Press.
10. စန္ဒာဆွေ။(၁၉၇၇)။စကားပုံကပြောသောဒဿန။ရန်ကုန်၊စိန်ကြည်ပုံနှိပ်တိုက်။
11. သာသနာရေးဝန်ကြီးဌာန။(၁၉၉၇)။ပါထိကဝဂ်ပါဠိတော်-မြန်မာပြန်။ရန်ကုန်မြို့၊သာသနာရေးဝန်ကြီးဌာန၊ သာသနာရေးဦးစီးဌာန။

Module No. : Phil 3206 (Elective)

Module Name : Ethics-I (Theoretical Ethics)

TOTAL HOURS : (60) Hours

Lecture : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– The chief aims of the course are to know the fundamental theory of ethics, the nature and scope of moral philosophy. And then how to define human conduct as good or bad and right and wrong from the ethical point of views. It can study why it is needed to relate an ethical theories and applied ethics in human daily life. Finally, ethics is a dynamic, evolving field of knowledge for applying, balancing, and modifying principles in light of new facts, new technology, new social attitudes and changing economic and political conditions.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. The Nature and Scope of Ethics
2. The Fundamental Concepts of Ethical Problems
3. A General Study of Some Western Ethical Theories
4. A General Study of Some Eastern Ethical Theories
4.1. Indian Ethics
4.2. Chinese Ethics
4.3. Japanese Ethics

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the understanding about ethics as a significant normative study and as its applied value in daily life and professional
  • to recognize ethics is a dynamic, evolving field of knowledge for applying, balancing, and modifying principles in light of new fact
  • to learn how to extent and interpret the role of ethics in society or several areas from the multidisciplinary perspectives
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • know and define the basic principles or ideas of fundamental theory of Ethics
  • identify the results of unethical behaviors in the history of human beings
  • learn the various ethical theories in western and eastern tradition and compare their strength and weakness of these theories
  • select good moral guideline for daily life and make open minded

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • indicate the relationship between ethics and morality
  • utilize the ethical norms and values for solving problems in daily life
  • identify ethical dilemmas and apply different theoretical approaches
  • critically assess the relationship between theory and practice in the formulation of values
REFERENCES

1. Fung Ya-Lan. (1948). A Short History of Chinese Philosophy. New York: The Macmillan Company.
2. Fung Yu-Lan. (1962). The Spirit of Chinese Philosophy. (Translated by Hughes). Boston: E. R. Beacon press.
3. Huxley, A. (Translated by Swami Prabhavamanda and Christopher Isherwood). (1954). Bhagava Gita. The new American Library.
4. Kaufman, Walter. (1975). Existentialism from Dosteusky to Sartre. New York: New American Library.
5. K. Piovesana S. J., Gino. (1997). Recent Japanese Philosophical Thought. Tokyo: Japanese Library.
6. Lillie, William. (1948). An Introduction of Ethics. New York: Methuen and Noble Inc.
7. Magill, Franh N. & Jan P Mcgreal. (1981). Masterpieces of World Philosophy. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers.
8. Melden, A.J. (1955). Ethical Theories. Prentice-hall Inc.
9. Robinson, Dave and Chris Garratt. (1999). Introducing Ethics. UK. Icon Books Ltd.
10. Ryusaku Tsunoda & Wm. Theodore de Bary. (1958). Sources of Japanese Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press.
11. Sharma, I.C. (1965). Ethical philosophies of India. New York: George Allen and Unwin.
12. Theodore de Bary, William. (edt.) (1958). Sources of Japanese Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press.
13. Theodore de Bary, William. (edt.) (1964). Source of Indian Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press.
14. Titus, H.H. (1966). Ethics for Today. New Delhi: Eurasia Publishing House.

BA Honours First Year(Semester II)

Foundation Course

Eng 3002 (3) English

Core Courses

Phil 3207 (4) Eastern Aesthetics
Phil 3208 (4) Advanced Logic-II
Phil 3209 (4) Philosophy of History-II
Phil 3210 (4) Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-II

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

Phil 3212 (3) Ethics-II (Applied Ethics)

Module No. : Phil 3207

Module Name : Eastern Aesthetics

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims at being an introduction to aesthetics of Eastern tradition such as Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and Myanmar art or aesthetic theories from the philosophical perspective. In addition, the course will provide an orientation about the notion of aesthetics and its applied values in not only in the sphere of art works, it can be found out or appreciate in daily life’s experience of the people through comparison between the Western aesthetic theories and those of the East.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. A Study of Some Eastern Aesthetics
1.1. Indian Aesthetics
1.2. Chinese Aesthetics
1.3. Japanese Aesthetics
2. Myanmar Aesthetics
2.1. Introduction to Myanmar Aesthetics
2.2. Zayya’s View on Art
2.3. Zawgyi’s View on Art
2.4. Dagon Taryar’s View on Art
2.5. Letwae Minnyo’s View on Art
2.6. Min Thu Wun’s View on Art
2.7. Shwe Don B Aung’s View on Film
2.8. Director U Thu Kha’s View on Film and Art
2.9. Bagyi Aung Soe’s View on Art

COURSE OBJECTIVE

S
The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the understanding about eastern aesthetics as a significant philosophical study as its applied value in daily life as well as professional.
  • to become familiar with the aesthetic concepts in the Eastern traditions
  • to learn how to appreciate and interpret the role of aesthetics in society or several areas from the multidisciplinary perspective
  • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • construct own assumptions and to make fair-minded or positive critique
  • practice for getting effective communicative skill with other people
  • choose the necessary and meaningful questions to ask other people in conducting their research or study and select what methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course
  • trace the former theories by using online or off line literature survey
  • organize the research frame logically and arrange good presentation with effective power point slides

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • judge what is authentic or inauthentic art by means of its genuine aesthetic value and utilize their
  • knowledge of value judgment in their daily lives

  • reconstruct a new perspective to recommend the further studies about axiological studies
  • ask new questions with sense of curiosity whatever they experience the relation of art and morality in daily life and share their knowledge and ideas to the others who have interest on making proper value judgement
  • discuss their own ideas in line with logical sequence with others
  • show their ideas with the suitable tools and devices which are needed to make presentation of the value theories
REFERENCES

1. Aldrich, V. C. (1963). Philosophy of Art. Prentice Hall, Inc., Englewood.
2. Commaraswamy, A. C. (1948). The Dance of Shivas. Bombay, Calcutta: Asia Publishing House.
3. Graham , Gordon. (2000). Philosophy of The Arts_An Introduction to Aesthetics_(2nd Edition). London & New York: Routledge.
4. Lin Yutang. (1969). The Chinese Theory of Art. London, England: Panther Book.
5. Stanley-Baker, Joan. (1988) Japanese Art, London: Thames and Hudson Ltd.
6. Stolnitz, J. (1981) Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art Criticism. U. S. A: Houghton Mifflin Company.
7. Suzuki, D.T. (1959). Zen and Japanese Culture. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
8. Theodore de Bary, William. (edt.). (1958). The Sources of Japanese Tradition. Vol.1, New York and London: Columbia University Press.
9. Theodore de Bary, William. (edt.). (1980). Sources of Chinese Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press.
10. Ueda Makoto. (1967). Literary and Art Theories in Japan. Cleveland: Press of Western Reserve University.
11. Xu Yuanxiang. (2007). Lao Tzu: The Eternal Tao Te Ching. Beijing: China International Press.
12. Zaw Lynn . (2002). “Contemporary Myanmar Painting as Art in Its Second Function”, Research Journal of the Arts and Science Vol. I: Arts & Humanities. Yangon: University Press.

Module No. : Phil 3208

Module Name : Advanced Logic-II

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course can be applied to establish the validity or invalidity of the arguments whose components are the truth-functionally compound statements cannot be applied to the arguments whose components are not compounds. The special symbols of logic are much better adapted than ordinary language to the actual process of inferences. The use of special technical symbols can also make the nature of deductive inference clear. The arguments are symbolized and proved by using nineteen Rules of inference, the strengthened Rule of Conditional Proof, four Quantification Rules and Quantifier Negation.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. Quantification Theory
2. Extended Theory of Quantification
3. Theory of Relations
4. Two types of deductive systems
4.1. Propositional calculus
4.2. Class calculus
5. Boolean Expansion

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to know the validity of the arguments involving quantifiers using the four quantification rules, UG, UI, EG and EI
  • to obtain the ability to identify validity and invalidity of an argument containing truth functionally compound statements by some methods
  • to apply the symbolize relational propositions in terms of propositional functions
  • to identity definite description and prove the validity of arguments involving identity symbols
  • to be able to decide the validity or invalidity of arguments by using the method of transforming into two Boolean Expansions
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • solve the linguistic difficulties in sciences by using technical and special symbolisms
  • improve the ability to think carefully and critically and writing skills which is essential for success in any field of work
  • manipulate self-study skill, critical thinking skill and problem solving skill
  • formulate more definite results by using quantification theories

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • judge the principles of logic to ordinary language reasoning
  • decide the validity or invalidity of arguments and solve the problems in reasonable way
  • share the basic skills of 21st century higher education students such as critical thinking, analytical and synthesis, decision-making, problem-solving, self-study, and communication skills
  • reconstruct lifelong benefits for improving one’s writing, thinking, and critical assessment of ideas
REFERENCES

1. Bernnan, J. G. A Handbook of Logic. New York: Harper & Row.
2. Copi, I. M. Symbolic Logic (Fifth Edition). London: The Macmillan Company,
3. Faris, J. A. (1964). Quantification Theories. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
4. Kar, K. N. and U Hla Bu., (1963). A Text Book of Modern Formal Logic (Third Edition). Yangon: Rangon University Press.
5. Layman, C. Stephen. (2005). The Power of Logic. New York: Mc Graw Hill Co, Inc.
6. Quine, W. V. O. (1962). Method of Logic (Second Edition). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
7. Purtill, R. L. (1971). Logic for Philosophers, New York: Harper & Row.

Module No. : Phil 3209

Module Name : Philosophy of History-II

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to introduce philosophy of history and examine the theoretical foundations of the practice, application, and social consequences of history with special reference to some nineteenth and twentieth century philosophers.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. A Study of Some Nineteenth Century Historical Theories
1.1. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
1.2. Karl Marx
2. A Study of Some Twentieth Century Philosophy of History
2.1. Leo Tolstoy
2.2. Oswald Spengler
2.3. Arnold Joseph Toynbee
2.4. E. H. Carr
3. Wave Theory of Alvin Toffler

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to explain the meaning of philosophy of history broadly
  • to become familiar with the famous philosophers’ view of philosophy of history especially from some nineteenth and twentieth century
  • to learn how to appreciate and interpret the role of philosophy of history from the multidisciplinary perspective
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes

    After this study, students will be able to

  • understand some philosophers’ views on history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from the philosophical perspective
  • identify the significance of key ideas and issues, period and people, events and movements in the world history
  • discuss the basic features of nineteenth and twentieth centuries historical theories
  • develop critical thinking skill and analytical skills
  • do team work and competitions for getting effective communicative skill select what methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • describe the opinions on history of some significant philosophers such as Hegel, Marx, Tolstoy, Spengler, Toynbee and Toffler.
  • summarize the different ideas and concepts of the significant philosophers
  • indicate philosophical views or theories more than one perspective
  • distinguish philosophical accounts of problem from other kinds of theoretical explanations
REFERENCES

1. Atkinson, R. F. (1978). Knowledge and Explanation in History. New York: Macmillan Education Ltd.
2. Carr, E. H. (1964). What is History. Cox and Warnan Ltd.
3. Collingwood, R. G. (1965). Essays in Philosophy of History. Texas: University of Texas Press.
4. Hegel, G. W. F. (1956). The Philosophy of History. New York: Dover Publications, INC.
5. Khaler, E. (1968). The Meaning of History. Meridian Book.
6. Popper, K. R. (1969). The Poverty of Historicism. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
7. Walsh, W. H. (1958). An Introduction to Philosophy of History. London: Hutchinson University Library.
8. Toffler, Alvin. (1982). The Third Wave. New York: Bantan Books.
9. Tolstoy, L. (1970). War and Peace. New York: Macmillan Lid.

Module No. : Phil 3210

Module Name : Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-II

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to introduce Myanmar view on the causal relation with reference to some Myanmar scholars. It can also be studied humanism in Myanmar literature, Myanmar philosophical view on history and Myanmar cultural traditions. In addition, this course highlights logical reasoning and aesthetic value of Myanmar literature especially in Myanmar riddles and poems. More specifically, this course examines the ethics, logic, and aesthetic value of Myanmar cultural heritage.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. Myanmar View on Cause and Effect
2. Humanism in Myanmar Literature
3. Myanmar Philosophical View on History
4. Filial piety in Myanmar Tradition
5. Logical Reasoning in Myanmar Riddles
6. The Role of Myanmar Poems in Environmental Aesthetics

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to understand the concept of Myanmar view on causal relation
  • to become familiar with Myanmar philosophical view on history
  • to know the concept of filial Piety in Myanmar and understand the essence of Buddha teaching
  • to learn how to appreciate Myanmar poems are significant in the environmental conservation
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • understand the concepts of the natural law and social Law in Myanmar Ways of thinking
  • illustrate the definition of Human Nature and the relation between Man and Nature
  • point out the concept of filial piety in Myanmar that has been widely influenced by Buddhism
  • improve analysis in studying Myanmar riddles and pomes
  • manipulate self-study skills and make fair-minded or positive critique

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • identify Myanmar traditional thought accepts the reality of the concept of law
  • indicate that the most of Myanmar obey the duty and keep up the obligations of the duty
  • apply the argument form of Myanmar Sagahta that is nearly similar with informal logic to improve logical thinking and reasoning skills.
  • formulate their new perspective to present new ideas in environmental conservation
REFERENCES

1. Ba Han, Dr. (edt.). (1964). Shin Uttamagyaw’s Tawla and Letwethondara’s Radus. Rangoon: The Hanthawaddy Press. (In Burmese by U Thein Han and U Wun)
2. Burma Piṭaka Association. (1987). Digha Nikãya-Long Discourses of the Buddha. Tokyo: Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai (Buddhist Promoting Foundation) (Reproduced and co-distributed).
3. Carlson, A. (2000). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art and Architecture. London: Routledge.
4. Goodman, Nelson (1976): Languages of Art, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.
5. Hla Pe. (1985). “Riddles” (Part E- On Life), BURMA: Literature, Historiography, Scholarship, Language, Life, and Buddhism. Presented to a Seminar at the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London). Singapore: Institute of South East Asian Studies. ISBN 9971-988 003.
6. Htin Aung, Dr. (1962) Folk Element in Myanmar Buddhism. London: Oxford University Press.
7. K. (2006). Myanmar Culture. Yangon: Today Publishing.
8. Khin Myo Chit. (1995). Colorful Myanmar. Yangon: Parami Sarpay.
9. Kyi Kyi Hla, Daw. (2004). A Myanmar Tapestry (A Collection of Articles on Myanmar): Yangon: Taw Win Publishing House.
10. Kyi Kyi Hla, Daw. (2010). The Ethics of Environmental Conservation. Yangon: Publication Committee, The Myanmar Academy of Arts and Science.
11. Ledi Sayadaw. (1965). Manual of Buddhism, Rangoon: Buddha Sasana Council.
12. Shwe Zan Aung. (1956). Compendium of Philosophy. London: Luzac& Co Ltd.
13. Taw Sein Ko. (1913). Burmese Sketches. Rangoon: British Burma Press.

Module No. : Phil 3212 (Elective)

Module Name : Ethics-II (Applied Ethics)

TOTAL HOURS : (60) Hours

Lecture : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– The chief aims of the course are to know the fundamental theory of ethics, the nature and scope of moral philosophy. And then how to define human conduct as good or bad and right and wrong from the ethical point of views. It can be studied why it is needed to relate an ethical theories and applied ethics in human daily life. Finally, ethics is a dynamic, evolving field of knowledge for applying, balancing, and modifying principles in light of new facts, new technology, new social attitudes and changing economic and political conditions.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. Introduction
2. Contemporary Ethical Issues
3. Current Ethical Issues in Myanmar
4. Guidelines Provided by the Cognitive Beliefs and Moral Values of Myanmar Theravada Buddhist Culture for Resolving Ethical Conflicts and Issues
4.1. The Brahma Vihara Dhamma As A Moral Norm
4.2. The Mangala Sutta as an Ethical Principle
4.3. The Law of Kamma as an Ethical Principle

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the understanding about ethics as a significant comparative study and as its applied value in daily life and professional
  • to recognize ethics is a dynamic, evolving field of knowledge for applying, balancing, and modifying principles in light of new fact
  • to learn how to extent and interpret the role of ethics in society or several areas from the multidisciplinary perspective
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • know and characterize the role of ethics in general
  • select good moral guidelines for life and make open minded
  • identify the results of unethical behavior in every professional career
  • apply ethical norms and values to solve ethical issues in social, political, economic, medical and ICT.
  • point out the role of applied ethics for resolving ethical conflicts in Myanmar

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • indicate the applied ethics is the application of general ethical theories to moral problems with the objective of solving the problems
  • resolve moral problems, ethical conflicts and global crisis
  • utilize their ethical knowledge of value judgment in their daily lives
  • initiate new approach to study current ethical issues by laying emphasis on ethical point of view
REFERENCES

1. Engel, J. Ronald & Joan Gibb Engle (edited). (1993). Ethics of Environment and Development. Tucson & London: The University of Arizona Press.
2. Kar, K. N. (1950). Ethics. Rangon: Sarpay Beikman Press.
3. Kyi Kyi Hla, Daw. (2010). The Ethics of Environmental Conservation. Yangon: Myanmar Academy of Arts and Science.
4. Gonsalves, Milton A. (1989). Right and Reason. London: The Macmillan Co.
5. Sīlānandābhivamsa, U. (2000). Paritta Pāli & Protective Verses. Yangon: International Theravāda Buddhist Missionary University.
6. Thiroux, Jacques P. (1980). Ethics: Theory and Practice. New York: Macmillan Publishing.
7. UNESCO. (2004). Ethics in Asia-Pacific. Bangkok: UNESCO.

BA Fourth Year       (Semester-I)

Eng 4001   – English                           (Foundation)

Phil 4101   – Philosophy of Religion-I                        (Core)

Phil 4102   – Problems of Philosophy-I                      (Core)

Phil 4104   – Research Methodology in Philosophy-I             (Core)

Phil 4106   – Political Philosophy (West)                                (Core)

*Elective   – Student’s Choice (from philosophy specialization)        (Elective)

BA Fourth Year (Semester-II)

Eng 4002  – English                                        (Foundation)

Phil 4107  – Philosophy of Religion-II                                   (Core)

Phil 4108  – Problems of Philosophy-II                                  (Core)

Phil 4110  – Research Methodology in Philosophy-II            (Core)

Phil 4112  – Political Philosophy (East)                                  (Core)

*Elective  – Student’s Choice (from philosophy specialization)         (Elective)

BA Honours Second Year(Semester-I)

Core Courses

Phil 4201 (4) Philosophy of Religion-I
Phil 4202 (4) Problems of Philosophy-I
Phil 4204 (4) Research Methodology in Philosophy-I
Phil 4205 (4) Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-I
Phil 4206 (4) Political Philosophy (West)

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

Phil 4213 (3) Philosophy of Language-I

Module No. : Phil 4201

Module Name : Philosophy of Religion-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to introduce the several definitions of religion from the philosophical perspective. This course contains the four major religions of the world and their theoretical and practical principles will be studied elaborately from the approach of philosophy of religion. In addition, the course will provide the knowledge of what are the differences between religion and theology and how religion has made a great contribution in moral cultivation of humankind that is essential for building peace and order of human societies since earliest times of human culture.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. Introduction to Philosophy of Religion
2. Approaches to Philosophy of Religion
3. The Four Religions of the World and their Philosophical Trends
4. Analytical Study of Philosophy of Religion
5. The Critical Examination of the Philosophy of Religion

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to understand philosophy of religion is not the study of religion from a specific religious point of view but rather is a careful analysis and critical evaluation of the philosophical implications of religion
  • to promote mutual understanding and mutual respect among the students who come from various religions and different cultural backgrounds
  • to be reflective movement within a religion lifts the religious consciousness into the region of speculative thinking
  • to distinguish critics, anthropologist, theologians and poets all argue about the nature, structure and function of symbols
  • to learn how to make philosophical linkage between the role of religion and the need of moral cultivation in human culture with wise and active point of view in order to promote their creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • improve for getting effective communicative skill with others
  • synthesize the different views of other scholars to draw the effective conclusion
  • make their new perspective to present new ideas in different kinds of religion
  • discuss with their own ideas in line with the main topic of their study without prejudice

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • judge different religions objectively
  • avoid religious extremism and to attain peace, unity and among those different religions
  • explain the origins of religion, showing particular awareness of the thought of four major religions in the world
  • obtain mutual respect among other peoples of different religions
REFERENCES

1. Adams, James L. (1976). On Being Human Religiously: Selected Essays in Religion and Society. New York: Beacon Press.
2. Cheney, Sheldon. (1974). Men Who Have Walked with God. New York: Delta.
3. Elidae, Mircea. (1973). Patterns in Comparative Religion. New York: Sheed and Word.
4. Hick, John. (1973). Philosophy of Religion. 2nd ed. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.
5. James, William. (1958). Varieties of Religious Experience. New York: Mentor.
6. Kitagawa, Joseph M. (1968). Religions of the East. Philadelphia. Westminister.
7. Pojman, Louis P. (1998). Philosophy of Religion: An Anthology. New York: wadsworth Publishing Co.
8. Chad Meister, (2009). Introducing Philosophy of Religion, London and New York: Routledge.
9. Pojman, Louis P. (2001). Philosophy: The Pursuit of Wisdom, US: Wadsworth, Thomson Learning.
10. Thiroux, Jacques P. (1980). Philosophy: Theory and Practice. New York: Macmillan Publishing. Company

Module No. : Phil 4202

Module Name : Problems of Philosophy-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to introduce the nature of philosophical problems by focusing on the epistemological problems and problems concerning truth such as reason versus perception, intuition, testimony, the correspondence theory, the coherence theory, and the pragmatic theory.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. The Nature of Philosophical Problems
2. A Study of Some Epistemological Problems
2.1. The Problem Concerning the Origin and Source of Knowledge
2.1.1. Reason Versus Perception
2.1.2. Intuition
2.1.3. Testimony
2.2. Problem of Truth
2.2.1. The Correspondence Theory
2.2.2. The Coherence Theory
2.2.3. The Pragmatic Theory

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to know the philosophical questions that arise from human thought and action
  • to become familiar with the philosophical problems such as the mind-body problem, the existence of God, freedom and determinism, the human nature, and how to get knowledge
  • to learn how to appreciate and interpret the problems of philosophy from the multidisciplinary perspective
  • to help students to be upgraded their skills of argumentation and listening which can bring them into research-oriented discussions
  • to engage in problem solving, creative thinking, and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • introduce students to some of the major problems encountered in philosophy
  • understand how to learn concepts, theories and problems academically
  • develop the general skills of formulating, defending, and critiquing of arguments and theoretical positions and the ability to think critically about difficult and abstract issues
  • present effectively own ideas through written and communication
  • manipulate effective discussion and consistent argumentation

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • develop the ability to think critically about difficult and abstract issues
  • identify, explain and evaluate philosophical problems and arguments logically
  • distinguish philosophical problems from other kinds of theoretical explanations
  • introduce other students to some of the major problems encountered in philosophy
  • utilize their knowledge of philosophical problems in their daily lives
REFERENCES

1. Blackwood, R. T. (1975). Problems in Philosophy: West and East. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.
2. Chatterjee. (1949). The Problems of Philosophy. Calcutta: Das Gupta.
3. Hartnack, J. (1962). Philosophical Problem- A Modern Introduction, Copenhagen: Munkasggaard.
4. Hirst, R. J. (1959). The Problem of Perception. London: Allen and Unwin.
5. Rachels, James. (2004). Problems from Philosophy. New York: Mc Graw Hill.
6. Ridling, Zaine PhD. (2001). Philosophy Then and Now: A Look Back at 26 Centuries of Thought . Part IV. Access Foundation.
7. Stumpf, Samuel Enoch & James Fieser. (2003). Philosophy: History and Problems.New York:Mc Graw Hill.

Module No. : Phil 4204

Module Name : Research Methodology in Philosophy -I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– This course aims to introduce the nature and role of research to students through studying concepts and methodological significance of philosophical research. To facilitate students how to construct a research proposal with its essential components such as research problem, hypothesis, methods, finding, principle and contribution. It also includes the study of types of research, methods of thinking, data collection and literature review.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. The Nature and Role of Research in Conceptual Learning
2. A General Study of Research Methodology
2.1. Research Problem
2.2. Research Hypothesis
2.3. Research Methods
2.4. Research Finding
2.5. Research Principle
2.6. Contribution
2.7. Definitions of Key words
3. Ways of Thinking and Research Methodology
– Methods of Thinking
4. What is a Research Problem?
– Data Collection and Literature Review

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to improve the understanding about research methodology and its role in conceptual learning
  • to gain familiarity with a phenomenon or to achieve new insights into it
  • to know the research procedures in humanities and social sciences
  • to learn types of research styles , nature of them and how to make a good research formally
  • to become develop the decision making, problem solving, critical thinking, and creative thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom or in making research of their own
  • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • understand the nature and scope of philosophical research and become familiar with research methods of humanities and social sciences
  • develop how to build research questions, data collection, discussion and argumentation
  • formulate their new trend to present new ideas by drawing out meaning from given data or statements, generate and evaluate arguments
  • choose the necessary and meaningful questions to ask other people in conducting their research or study and develop communicative skill
  • select what methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course and to organize the research frame logically

– The specific learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • learn how to think research problem, hypothetical solution, and outcomes
  • write a research paper from the philosophical methods which can apply in most disciplines because of its nature of multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary concerns
  • obtain the decision making skill and problem solving skill through the group works in writing assignment, planning research project in the classroom
  • apply values of philosophical research in social, political, cultural, regional, and global issues
  • sketch the key steps of sharing ideas in designing the effective presentation by making logical linkage
REFERENCES

1. Bloomberg, Linda Dale & Marie Volpe. (2012). Completing Your Qualitative Dissertation _A Road Map from Beginning to End_, 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.
2. Creswell, John.W. (1994). Research Design: Qualitative & Quantative Approaches. London: International Educational and Professional Publisher.
3. Feinberg, Joel. (2002). Doing Philosophy, A Guide to the Writing of Philosophy Paper. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/ Thomson Learning.
4. Good, C. V. & D. E. Scatws. (1979). Methods of Research. New York: Appleton Century Croft Inc.
5. Hansen, Kristine. (2003). Writing in the Social Sciences. USA: Pearson Custom Publishing.
6. Robert, Carol M. (2004). The Dissertation Journey. London: Sage Publications Co

Module No. : Phil 4205

Module Name : Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-I

TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION

– The chief aims of the course are to introduce the general features and specific ideas of Twentieth Century Eastern philosophy and philosophers. In this course the nature and scope of Indian philosophy and its close relation to cultural practice has deeply rooted in Hinduism. To encourage students’ more comprehensive review on “Significant Views of Outstanding Indian Philosopher, students’ preparation of reading primary or secondary sources thoroughly will be demanded.
– The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
1. A Brief Study of the Background of Indian Thought
2. A Critical Study of the Outstanding Indian Philosophers’ views
2.1. The Philosophy of Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
2.2. The Philosophy of Sri Aurobindo
2.3. The Philosophy of Rabindranath Tagore
2.4. The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are

  • to know the significant views of the Twentieth Century Indian Philosophers
  • to learn how to define the origin of Indian philosophy and its significant trend
  • to identify how to be the inseparable bond of the ways of philosophy, arts and literature, and political ideas in the Indian tradition
  • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
  • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
LEARNING OUTCOMES

– The generic learning outcomes
After this study, students will be able to

  • explain the general features of Twentieth Century Indian Philosophy
  • identify their outstanding views in education system, moral teaching and political thought with comparison to those of Indian philosophy
  • compare and contrast the views of the outstanding Indian philosophers
  • select a better way to learn thoughts and cultural practice of other cultures
  • – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

  • indicate the relationship between the philosophy and religious teachings in Indian tradition
  • extend a deeper understanding of the nature and scope of Twentieth Century Indian Philosophy
  • improve insight into close relation of Arts and Literature, Education, and Politics in Indian Philosophical framework
  • utilize their knowledge of Indian philosophy which had developed in the Twentieth Century when they study the Twentieth Century Japanese and Chinese Philosophies in Semester-II
  • REFERENCES

    1. Dasgupta, S. (1965). Development of Moral Philosophy in India. New York: Frederick Ugra Publishing Co.
    2. Radhakrishnan, S. (Edited). (1952) Contemporary Indian Philosophy. London: George Allen & Unwin.
    3. Radahakrishnan, S. & C. A. Moore (Edited). (1957). A Source Book in Indian Philosophy. Princeton University Press.
    4. Theodore de Bary, William & others (edt. & Compiled). (1959). A Source Book in Indian Philosophy. Columbia University Press.

    Module No. : Phil 4206

    Module Name : Political Philosophy (West)

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to introduce political philosophy of the west in general rather than to provide a full survey of origin, problem, value and essential political concepts of western political philosophy. This course give comprehensive accounts from ancient Greek to recent political thinkers, formulate their views and how they grapple with their political views. In addition, the course will provide a preliminary orientation about the notion of political argument, its various forms and the ways should be analyzed.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Introduction to Political Philosophy
    2. Essential Political Concepts
    3. Ancient Greek and Roman Political Institutions and Political Philosophy
    4. Medieval Political Philosophy
    5. Modern Political Philosophies
    6. Social Contract Theories
    7. Political Theories of the French Revolution
    8. Political Philosophy of Adam Smith and Malthus
    9. Marxist Political Thought
    10. Recent Political Thoughts

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to understand the nature and scope of western political philosophy from the political theories of Greek and Roman to the recent debates of political philosophers
    • to appreciate the voices of demand for Democracy and written Constitutional Governments
    • to obtain the ability to analyse and synthesize the different political ideas
    • to improve the critical thinking skill for evaluating the strong and weakness of several political theories
    • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • construct analogies to illustrate their political standpoint logically
    • to indicate how to train to be perfect guardians
    • make their new perspective to present new ideas in current political situation
    • distinguish from political philosophy, politics and political science
    • make fair-minded or positive critique

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • learn different political views from their own perspective objectively
    • avoid extremes and to think or make discussion of the possible way how to bring society towards peace and unity
    • synthesize the different political views to draw the effective conclusion by analyzing significant political concepts and events
    • make their new perspective to present to others for promoting further interested discussion of politics
    REFERENCES

    1. Aristotle. (Jowett, Benjamin (trans.)). (1900). The Politics. New York: The Colonial Press.
    2. Fukuyama, Francis. (2011). The Origins of Political Order. Nwe York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
    3. Fukuyama, Francis. (2014). The Origins of Political Decay. Nwe York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
    4. Gettell, Raymond G. (1953). History of Political Thought. London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd.
    5. Goodin, Robert E. (2007). A Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy Vol .I&II. (Second Edition). Backwell Publishing Ltd.
    6. Nelson, Brain R. (2009). Western Political Thought. Delhi: Dorling Kindersley (India) Pvt, Ltd.
    7. Sabine, George H. (1963). A History of Political Theory. London: George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd.

    Module No. : Phil 4213 (Elective)

    Module Name : Philosophy of Language-I

    TOTAL HOURS : (60) Hours

    Lecture : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – The purpose of this module is to introduce what philosophy of language is and to convey the development of Philosophy of Language in the West. Students will have the chance to study the significant transitional points of linguistic turn in the West from philosophical point of view from the time of ancient Greek to the Postmordern (developed in the mid-to late 20th century).
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Introduction to Philosophy of Language
    1.1. Philosophy and Language
    1.2. Language and Thought
    1.3. Nature, Function and Scope of Philosophy of Language
    2. Western Philosophical Perspectives on Language
    2.1. Ancient Greek
    2.2. Early Modern Period
    3. The Linguistic Turn of Western Philosophy
    4. Structuralism, Postmodernism and Deconstructionism

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • aim to know nature, function and scope of philosophy of language
    • to improve understanding about the philosophy of language is connected to other sub-disciplines in philosophy
    • to examine the study of language is itself partly a philosophical enterprise
    • It can examine the philosophical study of natural language and its working, particularly of linguistic meaning and the use of language
    • It can explore as a very newly developing branch of philosophy has engaged since the age of analysis or 20th century western philosophy, the philosophical thoughts concerning language seen in the writings of Ancient Greek philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • understand historical development of the Philosophy of Language
    • demonstrate a through insight in problems of Philosophy of Language
    • explain some major issues in the Philosophy of Language
    • critically evaluate theories, arguments and pre-suppositions in the Philosophy of Language
    • explore the philosophical investigation of the nature of language; the relation between language, language users, and the world

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • understand how to learn a language philosophically by analyzing its major components and its functions
    • indicate language, philosophy and culture are three overlapping areas of human studies in current time
    • point out philosophy of language is a systematic and theoretical study about the nature and meaning of the concept ‘language’ from the philosophical point of view
    • judge the difference between linguistic philosophy and the philosophy of language
    REFERENCES

    1. Alston, William P. (1964). Philosophy of Language. Prentice-Hall Inc.
    2. Cassirer, Ernst. (1953). An Essay on Man. New York: Anchor Book.
    3. Garvey, James & Jeremy Stangroom. The Story of Philosophy: A History of Western Thought. Quercus Book.
    4. Magee, Bryan. (2011).The Story of Philosophy. Singapore: Dorling Kindersley Book.
    5. Morris, Michael. (2006). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    6. Morris, Charles. (1964). Signification and Significance. Cambridge: M.I.T Press.
    7. Pike, Kenneth L. (1993). Talk Thought and Think. U.S. A: Sil International, Global Publishing.
    8. Sawyer, Sarah (edt). (2010). New Waves in Philosophy of Language. Macmillan.

    BA Honours Second Year(Semester-II)

    Core Courses

    Phil 4207 (4) Philosophy of Religion-II
    Phil 4208 (4) Problems of Philosophy-II
    Phil 4210 (4) Research Methodology in Philosophy-II
    Phil 4211 (4) Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-II
    Phil 4212 (4) Political Philosophy (East)

    Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

    Phil 4214 (3) Philosophy of Language-II

    * As the BA Honours degree course, Students require to submit a term paper which is necessarily linked to the Two core modules (Phil 4104/Phil 4110: Research Methodology in Philosophy-I/II) at BA Honours third year.

    Module No. : Phil 4207
    Module Name : Philosophy of Religion-II
    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours
    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to introduce history and philosophy of religion and to promote students’ understanding of the diverse religions with comparative study and critical examination of the nature of philosophy of religion. Though the course bases on the thorough study of the various religious problems come from their particular nature and cultural backgrounds, Buddhism will be highlighted because of its unique philosophical nature.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. History and Philosophy of Religion
    2. History of Buddhism
    3. Buddhism as Philosophy and Buddhism as Religion
    4. A Comparative Study of Religion
    5. The Critical Examination of Philosophy of Religion

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to understand what are the primary philosophical differences between the Theravāda Buddhism and the Mahāyāna Buddhism
    • to recognize about the wisdom is purified by morality and morality is purified by wisdom
    • to realize Buddhism as Philosophy and Buddhism as Religion
    • to learn how to appreciate and interpret all the role of religion in the world it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
    • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • construct analogies to illustrate from the religious point of views
    • make their new perspective to present new ideas in religions
    • distinguish from religion and philosophy of religion
    • discuss their own religious ideas in line with other religions
    • make fair-minded or positive critique

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • judge different views on religions objectively
    • avoid religious extreme to find out the way to peace and unity among the people of those different religions
    • present their new perspective or ideas based on the proper understanding of different religions
    • synthesize the different views of other scholars to draw the effective conclusion by analyzing key concepts and ideas of philosophy of religion
    REFERENCES

    1. Adams, James L. (1976). On Being Human Religiously: Selected Essays in Religion and Society. New York: Beacon Press.
    2. Cheney, Sheldon. (1974). Men Who Have Walked with God: New York: Delta.
    3. Earhart, H Byron. (1982). Japanese Religion, California: Wadsworth Publishing Company.
    4. Elidae, Mircea. (1973). Patterns in Comparative Religion: New York: Sheed and Word.
    5. Hick, John. (1973). Philosophy of Religion. 2nd ed. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.
    6. James, William. (1958). Varieties of Religious Experience. New York: Mentor.
    7. Kitagawa, Joseph M. (1968). Religions of the East. Philadelphia. Westminister.
    8. Miller, Edward L. (1972). God and Reason: A Historical Approach to Philosophical Theory. New York: Macmillan.
    9. Needleman, Jacob. (1970). The New Religions. New York: Doubleday.
    10. Vries, Jan De. (1967). The Study of Religion: New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

    Module No. : Phil 4208

    Module Name : Problems of Philosophy-II

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course will provide the effective way of studying philosophical problems through the topics found in the ontological problems and ethical problems such as the problem of Being and Becoming, substance, human nature, individual and society and human freedom and determinism.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. A Study of Ontological problems
    1.1. The problem of Being and Becoming
    1.2. The problem of Substance
    2. Ethical problem
    2.1. The problem of human nature
    2.2. The problem of Individual and society
    2.3. The problem of human freedom and determinism

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to introduce the philosophical problems that arise in Ontology and Ethics of philosophy
    • to improve the understanding about eastern and western views on human nature
    • to know the important role of individual and society and how it relates from the multidisciplinary perspective
    • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
    • to engage students in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
    • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • draw out ideas from philosophical problems and evaluate arguments and make their own judgment
    • establish their conversation with understanding and positive critique
    • clearly express the original ideas and solve problems appropriate to the contexts
    • ask new questions with sense of curiosity whatever they learned from this course
    • promote their ability to think critically

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • utilize their knowledge to solve the particular problems in their daily lives from philosophical perspective
    • explain the nature of philosophical problems and arguments
    • evaluate the problems of existence of the things nature and social problems from the ontological or ethical point of views
    • distinguish philosophical accounts of problems from other kinds of theoretical explanations
    • introduce other students to some of the major problems encountered in Philosophy
    • initiate their new approaches to study the problems of philosophy
    REFERENCES

    1. Blackwood, R.T. & A.L. Herman (edtd). (1975). Problems in Philosophy: West and East. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.
    2. Hartnack, J. (1962). Philosophical Problem-A Modern Introduction. Munkasggaard, Copenhagen.
    3. Hirst, R. J. (1959). The Problem of Perception. London, Allen and Unwin.
    4. Rachels, James. (2004). Problems from Philosophy. New York: Mc Graw Hill.
    5. Ridling, Zaine PhD. (2001). Philosophy Then and Now: A Look Back at 26 Centuries of Thought , Part IV. Access Foundation.
    6. Stumpf, Samuel Enoch & James Fieser. (2003). Philosophy: History and Problems. New York: Mc Graw Hill.

    Module No. : Phil 4210

    Module Name : Research Methodology in Philosophy -II

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks= (45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks= (30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to empower the students to write the research paper practically. Hence, how to write essential components of a research proposal and how to complete their paper will be highlighted. In order to achieve this purpose, student will be demanded for going field trip (urban or rural) and doing data collection (literature survey, interview, and questionnaire) as compulsory activities.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. The Writing of an Abstract
    2. The Entry of Notes, Bibliography, Diagrams, Illustration, Contents
    3. Principles of Usage (Words, Citation, Quotation, and so forth)
    4. Ethical Consideration

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to improve organizing the research frame logically and formally
    • to share how to write not to commit plagiarism by using quotations or citations properly
    • to indicate how to write abstract, notes , bibliography, diagrams, illustration and contents specifically
    • to learn, practice and improve the research presentation skills and with the latest tools
    • to understand the research ethics and academic integrity of which publications and research procedure
    • to become develop the logical thinking skills, problem solving skills, critical thinking skills and creative thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom or in making research of their own
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • become research-minded persons or passionate researchers in future
    • understand how to write a good research paper with correct format and logical sequence
    • apply correct usage of grammar or words and learn ethical consideration in writing research
    • identify consistencies and inconsistencies of specific philosophical theories or worldviews
    • trace the former theories by using literature survey to make their new trend to present new ideas
    • create good presentation with the effective power point slides and digital literacy skill

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • learn how to write an abstract, notes, bibliography, diagrams, Illustration, contents and select suitable words or correct grammar
    • understand about plagiarism and how to avoid plagiarism and how to write ethically
    • apply the crucial role of research in higher education sector, to grasp the philosophical research in the disciplines of social sciences and humanities
    • obtain the decision making skill and problem solving skill through the group works in writing assignment, planning research project in the classroom
    • improve presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey
    REFERENCES

    1. Bloomberg, Linda Dale & Marie Volpe. (2012). Completing Your Qualitative Dissertation _A Road Map from Beginning to End_, 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.
    2. Creswell, John.W. (1994). Research Design: Qualitative & Quantative Approaches. London: International Eductional and Professional Publisher.
    3. Feinberg, Joel. (2002). Doing Philosophy, A Guide to the Writing of Philosophy Paper. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/ Thomson Learning.
    4. Good, C. V. & D. E. Scatws. (1979). Methods of Research. New York: Appleton Century Croft Inc.
    5. Hansen, Kristine. (2003). Writing in the Social Sciences. USA: Pearson Custom Publishing.
    6. Robert, Carol M. (2004). The Dissertation Journey. London: Sage Publications Co.

    Module No. : 4211

    Module Name : Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-II

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks= (45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks= (30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – The chief aims of the course are to have more understanding the philosophies of significant Japanese and Chinese philosophers of the Twentieth Century. The course will be highlighted on some particular and important concepts and thoughts in Twentieth Century Japanese and Chinese philosophies. Students will have opportunity to upgrade their knowledge of Japanese and Chinese philosophies more deeply through this course.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Nishida’s Philosophy of Mu
    2. A Critical Study of the Outstanding Japanese Philosophy
    3. A Brief Study of the Background of Chinese Thought
    4. A Critical Study of the Writing of the Outstanding Japanese Philosophers
    5. General Characteristics and Evaluation of Contemporary Eastern Philosophy

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • The aim of the course is exactly to know the Twentieth Century Japanese and Chinese Philosophy.
    • to know how to define the Japanese and Chinese philosophy and trend of it
    • to recognize the significant ethical, metaphysical, epistemological, and political thoughts under the umbrella of Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy by means of comparison among diverse philosophies
    • it challenges students to engage in analytical thinking, synthesis, and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
    • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study students will be able to

    • understand the nature and significant characteristics the Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy
    • develop proper understanding of Japanese and Chinese traditions
    • identify the results of their outstanding views in epistemological concepts, education system, moral teaching, political thought
    • select a better way to learn broadly and think logically through the comparative study among those Eastern ways of thinking

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • indicate the relationship between traditional impact of social and religious thoughts and Twentieth Century Japanese and Chinese philosophies
    • get deeper understanding of general features of the Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy
    • comprehend the close linkage of philosophy and other spheres of human culture
    • utilize their knowledge to be mutual understanding among the culture and social welfare of Eastern Nations
    REFERENCES

    1. Blocker, H. Gene & Christopher L. Starling. (2001). Japanese Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    2. Boot, Willen. (2006). Sources of Japanese Tradition, Volume 2: Part One: 1600 to 1868 (2nd Abridged edition).Columbia University Press.
    3. Chan, Wing-Tsit. (1963). A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. USA: Printice Hall, Inc.
    4. James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis (Author, Editor). (2011). Japanese Philosophy: A Source Book. University of Hawaii Press.
    5. Keene, Donald. (April 10 2002). Sources of Japanese Tradition: Volume 1: From Earliest Times to 1600 (2nd Revised edition). Columbia University Press.
    6. Lai, Karyn L.. (2008). Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    7. Nakamura Hajime. (1964). Ways of Thinking of Eastern Peoples: India, China, Tibet, Japan. (Revised edition). University of Hawaii Press.
    8. Natamura & Nakamura Hajime. (1999). A History of the Development of Japanese Thought. Routledge.
    9. Piovesana, Gino. (2003). Contemporary Japanese Philosophical Thought. Tokyo.
    10. Tsunoda, R.(Compiled). (1960). Sources of Japanese Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Module No. : Phil 4212

    Module Name : Political Philosophy (East)

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to introduce political philosophy of the East in general rather than to provide a full survey of Hindu, Chinese and Japanese’s political thoughts are essential political concepts. This course give comprehensive accounts from ancient Hindu to today, high growth democracy political thinkers formulate their views and how they grapple with their political views. In addition, the course will provide a preliminary orientation about the notion of political argument, its various forms and the ways should be analyzed.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Indian Political Thoughts
    1.1. Introduction to Ancient Indian Political Thought
    1.2. Modern Period
    2. Chinese Political Thoughts
    2.1. Ancient Period
    2.2. Modern Period
    2.3. Post-Mao China
    3. Japanese Political Thoughts
    3.1. Ancient and Medieval Thought
    3.2. Modern Period
    3.3. Political Thoughts after the Meiji Restoration
    3.4. Constitutional Government and Democracy: Yoshino Sakuzo

    COURSE OBJECTIVES
  • to improve the basic understanding about the political philosophy of the East
  • to understand the nature of eastern political philosophy, especially Indian, Chinese and Japanese
  • to introduce the crucial role of philosophy in the Eastern tradition since ancient times
  • to learn how to practice all the political power vested group the citizens
  • to obtain the skills to analyse and synthesize the different political ideas or thoughts
  • to improve the critical thinking skill for evaluating the strong and weakness of several political theories
  • to develop the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • construct analogies to illustrate from political point of views
    • grasp the significant features of eastern traditional thought
    • make their new perspective to present new ideas in current political situation
    • distinguish from political philosophy, politics and political science
    • make fair-minded or positive critique

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • judge different views on politics of the East objectively
    • reconstruct a new perspective to recommend the further studies and to present new ideas
    • judge what are the good or bad impacts of political ideology on society especially in the eastern tradition
    • synthesize the different views to draw the effective conclusion
    REFERENCES
    Module No. : Phil 4214 (Elective)

    Module Name : Philosophy of Language-II

    TOTAL HOURS : (60) Hours

    Lecture : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – The purpose is enable students to examine the specific features of Philosophy of Language and apply their knowledge in other studies in humanities and social sciences. From this study, students will be expected to have better understanding the crucial role of philosophical approach in linguistic research and studies.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Theories Concerning Philosophy of Language
    1.1. Theories of Meaning
    1.2. Theory of Signs
    2. Language and Reality
    3. Ordinary Language Philosophy
    4. Philosophy of Language and Other Areas of Human Studies
    4.1. Philosophy of Language and Linguistics
    4.2. Philosophy of Language and Logic

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • aim to know the different theories in language
    • to improve understanding about the philosophy of language is connected to other sub-disciplines in philosophy
    • to understand about language and reality, difference between philosophy of language and linguistics and philosophy of language and logic
    • It can explore as a very newly developing branch of philosophy has engaged since the age of analysis or 20th century western philosophy, the philosophical thoughts concerning language seen in the writings of Ancient Greek philosopher such as Plato and Aristotle
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • understand that contemporary philosophy of language plays important role in studying the linguistic theories of meanings and signs
    • to have proper understanding of the functions and notions of language and its origins in philosophy
    • critically evaluate the relation between Language and Reality
    • explain the different conceptions of Ordinary Language, Philosophy, Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of linguistics, and Semiotics and semantics

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

  • apply some key terms in Philosophy of Language and Linguistic Philosophy
  • to indicate ‘Language’ play a vital position in the current issues and problems which are solved by most contemporary philosophers
  • to explore theories concerning Philosophy of Language
  • to contrast differences between Language, Logic and Reality
  • initiate their new approaches to study various types of theory of Philosophy of Language by using online media such as YouTube or other else
  • REFERENCES

    1. Alston, William P. (1964). Philosophy of Language. Prentice-Hall Inc.
    2. Cassirer, Ernst. (1953). An Essay on Man. New York: Anchor Book.
    3. Garvey, James & Jeremy Stangroom. The Story of Philosophy: A History of Western Thought. Quercus Book.
    4. Magee, Bryan. (2011).The Story of Philosophy. Singapore: Dorling Kindersley Book.
    5. Morris, Michael. (2006). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    6. Morris, Charles. (1964). Signification and Significance. Cambridge: M.I.T Press.
    7. Pike, Kenneth L. (1993). Talk Thought and Think. U.S. A: Sil International, Global Publishing.
    8. Sawyer, Sarah (edt). (2010). New Waves in Philosophy of Language. Macmillan.

    BA Honours Third Year(Semester-I)

    BA (Honours) Third Year (Semester-I)

    Phil 5201 (4) Issues in Indian Philosophy
    Phil 5202 (4) Issues in Western Philosophy-I
    Phil 5203 (4) Philosophy of Education-I
    Phil 5204 (4) Topics in Buddhism-I
    Phil 5205 (4) Ethics of Virtue-I (Plato)
    Phil 5206 (4) Selected Philosophical Writings-I

    Module No. : Phil 5201

    Module Name : Issues in Indian Philosophy

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    • The purpose of this subject is enable students to examine the synthetic ways of thinking of Eastern Philosophy. Students have to study characteristic of Indian Philosophy, stages and development of Indian Philosophy and a general survey of Indian Philosophical systems. In addition, students will study the problems of Reality, knowledge, causation and sources of Indian Ethics.
    • The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
      1. The Problem of Reality in Indian Philosophy
        – The Law of Kamma
      2. The Problem of Knowledge in Indian Philosophy
        – Means to The Ultimate Goal
      3. The Problem of Causation
      4. Metaphysical Background of Ethical Theories
    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to notice that the aim of the Indian philosophy, except Charvaka school, is to be released from the imposition of endless lives,
    • to improve the understanding about the problems of Reality, Epistemology, Causation and Ethical theories in Indian Philosophy,
    • to provide opportunities for a comprehensive study and understanding of Indian Philosophical concepts through analysis of primary texts and commentaries,
    • to examine the notion of liberation is ethico-religious character in Indian culture,
    • to explore some keys concepts of Religious and Ethical terms such as Brahman, Ataman, Dharma, Karma, Moksha, Non-violence etc.
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • understand how Indian philosophers view the problem of reality, knowledge, and causation in India philosophy,
    • interpret Indian traditions of thought and their conceptual foundations including perception, categories and methods,
    • distinguish and discuss the concept of karma in different ways with Jainism and Buddhism
    • display Ethics, Religion and Philosophy are mixed in Indian culture
    • assess complex philosophical argumentation, to develop a reasoned framework for their own worldview as well as enhance their composition skills.

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • compare the history of Western thought and Eastern thought
    • analyze the key concepts in Indian Philosophy,
    • judge Indian Philosophy is not simply a matter of logic or speculation, but is also concerned with religious practice in this life and life after death,
    • indicate Indian Philosophy is traditionally called Darshana implying thereby insight into the real nature of things,
    • discuss studying Eastern Philosophy is not, for someone brought up in the West, simply a matter of looking with detached interest at ideas that come from other culture.
    REFERENCES

    1. Bali, D. R. (1997). Introduction to Philosophy (Revised Edition). New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Private Limited.
    2. Datta & Chatterjee. (1956). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy. Calcutta: University of Calcutta Press.
    3. Hiriyana, M. (1949). The Essentials of Indian Philosophy. London: Unwin Brothers Ltd.
    4. Hiriyanna, M. (1963). The Essentials of Indian Philosophy. Bombay: Blackie and Son Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
    5. Radhakrishnan, Sir. (1982). History of Philosophy Eastern & Western. London: Allen & Unwin.

    Module No. : Phil 5202

    Module Name : Issues in Western Philosophy-I

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    • This course presents the world views of philosophers from ancient to modern times. The philosophers will be chosen from a broad range of historical and cultural backgrounds. This course will also provide both an overview of Western Philosophy in some points as well as an exploration of some of the most important philosophical issues. Special attention is given to how ancient and modern thinkers understood the problem of reality, mind and metaphysics, the search for truth and the limits of human knowledge and reason. Primary emphasis is on the evaluation of these thinkers’ views.
    • The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
      1. The Problem of Reality
      1.1. The Pre-Socratic Materialists
      1.2. Early Nonphysical Views of Reality
      1.3. Plato’s Forms
      1.4. Aristotle’s Metaphysics
      2. Mind and Metaphysics
      2.1. Rene Descartes
      2.2. Baruch Spinoza
      2.3. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
      3. Idealism
      4. The Search for Truth
      4.1. Rationalism and Empiricism
      4.2. Skepticism
    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to understand fundamental issues, including the problem of reality, the nature of mind and the search for truth,
    • to observe changes of intellectual outlook over time, and the effect of scientific, religious, cultural, and social concerns on the development of philosophical ideas,
    • to improve analytical and critical reading, writing and reasoning skills through an examination of the works of ancient and modern philosophers
    • to examine the wide diversity and historical background of philosophical positions,
    • to reconstruct a new perspective based on studying into issues of Western philosophy.
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • comprehend and discuss some philosophical issues in the course
    • respond clearly, logically and critically to questions and discussion about some important philosophical issues relevant to the course
    • synthesize and reflect some important aspects of the contributions of Western philosophy
    • compare and contrast the core of a philosophical problems, issues, or question by referencing the inquiry to a system

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • demonstrate a basic understanding of issues in Western philosophy relevant to each of the topics of the course
    • share some insight into the origins, motivations, and evolution of these issues as well as their implications for contemporary thought
    • differentiate consistencies and inconsistencies of specific philosophical theories or worldviews
    • synthesize the different views of other scholars to draw the effective conclusion
    REFERENCES

    1. Jones, W.T. and Robert J. Fogelin. (1998) The Twentieth Century to Quine and Derrida (Third Edition). Harcourt Brace College Publishers.
    2. Ridling, Zaine PhD. (2001). Philosophy Then and Now: A Look Back at 26 Centuries of Thought, Part I to IV. Access Foundation, (eBook).
    3. Solomon, Robert C. (1998) The Big Questions (Fifth Edition). Harcourt Brace College Publishers.

    Module No. : Phil 5203

    Module Name : Philosophy of Education -I

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims at being an introduction to meaning, concepts, nature and function of education and some significant educational philosophers to provide a brief survey of philosophical disciplines, their methods, doctrines and leading ideas. This course is to arrive at a clear understanding of the concept of education and as a result be a better position to assess educational institutions and to determine what can be done to improve them in their function as educational institutions. In addition, the course will provide idealism and realism as a great concern for education.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Meaning of Philosophy of Education
    2. The Concepts of Education
    3. Values and Education
    4. Ethics and Education
    5. Eastern Philosophies and Education
    6. Idealism and Education
    7. Realism and Education

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to understand the meaning, concepts, nature and function of education
    • to improve understanding about the basic characteristics of concept, value, ethics in education
    • to learn how to apply realism and idealism so that student can face the real challenges of life
    • it challenges students to engage in critical thinking, to rethink assumptions and resist dogmatism or pat answers
    • to improve the sense of interdisciplinary approach through the presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • discuss the different significance of aim, methods, curriculum and critique in education
    • share their own ideas in line with educational philosophy
    • develop their critical skills and analytical skills
    • select which methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course
    • construct own assumptions to suitable system for the students in line with the 21st Century skills

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • distinguish the role of education and its development
    • reconstruct a new perspective to recommend the further studies about education
    • justify different ideas of eastern educational philosophy by their point of views
    • describe philosophy of education from different perspectives to the strength and weakness of each system
    • arrange their new approaches to study educational theories by laying emphasis on the philosophical point of view
    REFERENCES

    1. Gutek, Gerald L. (1997). Historical And Philosophical Foundations of Education A Biographical Introduction. New Jersey: Merrill, an important of Prentice Hall.
    2. Hamm, Cornel M. (1989). Philosophical Issues in Education: An Introduction. New York: The Flamer Press.
    3. Kneller, George F. (1986). Introduction To The Philosophy Of Education. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
    4. Knowles, Richard T and Mc Learn, George. (1992). Psychological Foundations of Moral Education And Character Development: An Integrated Theory of Moral Development. Washington: Library of Congress Cataloging-in- Publication.
    5. Mclean, George F. (1991). Chinese Foundations for Moral Education And Character Development. Washington: Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication.
    6. Mujibul Hasan Siddiqui. (2016). Philosophical And Sociological Foundations Of Education. New Delhi: A P H Publishing Corporation.
    7. Olson, Ivan (2000). The Arts and Critical Thinking in American Education. London: An Important of Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc.
    8. Ozmon, Howard A. & Samuel M. Craver. (1986). Philosophical Foundations of Education. London: Merrill Publishing Company.
    9. Sharma, Promila. (2013). Philosophy of Education. New Delhi: A P H Publishing Corporation.
    10. Tubbs, Nigel. (2004). Philosophy’s Higher Education. New York: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Module No. : 5204

    Module Name : Topics in Buddhism-I

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to learn about different schools of Indian philosophy and how they are different and examine the known historical facts of the Buddha’s life. His teachings are introduced, including the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path to Enlightenment, and the five Precepts. It focuses on the history of Buddhist philosophy in the 2500 years science its origin and the differences among the main branches into which Buddhism has evolved. This course provides students with the opportunity to understand explain and critique the broadest possible conceptions of human identity, diversity, and community, as well as how these conceptions should fit into our lives.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. The Background of Buddhism
    1.1. Upanisad Thinkers
    1.2. 7th B.C. Astika and Nastika Thinkers
    2. Life of the Buddha
    2.1. Social Life in the time of Buddha
    2.2. Renunciation, Enlightenment and Demise in Kasinagar
    3. A Historical sketch of Buddhism
    3.1. 45 Years of Buddha’s Mission
    3.2. Basic Teachings of the Buddha

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to improve the understanding of the historical roots of early Buddhism
    • to make sure a good grasp of the fundamental of Buddhist philosophical thought
    • to consider the nature of Nirvana and Enlightenment, and the distinction between the two
    • to obtain the opportunity to survey the various ways Buddhism has obvious in different parts of the word during diverse time periods
    • to provide students with the necessary foundations to explore further the Buddhist world in the form of further academic courses or self-study.
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • make known the principles of Buddhism and to encourage the study and practice of those principles,
    • propose a solid foundation of early Buddhist thought and the necessary tools for approaching the later Buddhist traditions,
    • analyze and synthesize the major forms of Buddhism, including Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism, important historical, philosophical and development of Buddhism
    • obtain the synthesis, decision-making, problem-solving, self-study, and communication skills by means of conducting the active tutorial and discussion class, group work for presentation and assignment.

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • describe the background history of Buddhism and Life of the Buddha,
    • understand the significant features of Buddhism and basic teaching of the Buddha,
    • share the knowledge that is some touchstone ideas in Buddhist philosophy to others clearly
    • practice ways of thinking in daily life as a permanent process of change,
    • compare and contrast Buddhism to other religious traditions with which they may be familiar, and be applied to any other subject that they wish to analyze
    REFERENCES

    1. Chatterjee, Satischandra. (1960). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy. Calcutta: Calcutta University Press.
    2. Dasgupta, Surama. (1965). Development of Moral Philosophy in India. New York: Unbar Publishing Co.
    3. Radhakrishnan, S. (1953). History of Philosophy: Eastern and Western, Vol. I. London: Unwin Brothers Ltd.
    4. Radhakrishnan, S. (1957). A Source Book in Indian Philosophy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
    5. Theodore de Bary, William. (1959). Sources of Indian Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press

    Module No. : Phil 5205

    Module Name : Ethics of Virtue-I (Plato)

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – The purpose of this course is to enable you to examine the synthetic ways of Plato’s Virtue Ethics. This course surveys the essential content of the philosophies of Plato and considers more briefly some of the earlier thinkers whose ideas set the context for their works. This course covers general study of Plato’s philosophy and his view on knowledge and virtue.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. A General Study of Plato’s Philosophy
    2. Plato’s View on Knowledge and Virtue
    2.1. Plato’s conception of Knowledge
    2.2. Plato’s Conception of Virtue

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to improve the understanding of the Plato’s theory of knowledge in detail,
    • to become familiar with ethical theories and their foundational principles and assumptions,
    • to achieve a direct views of Virtue Ethics and it serves as the cornerstone in Plato works, the key to understanding his philosophical world,
    • to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • know the dialogues fall into three main groups which correspond roughly to the three periods of Plato’s life
    • demonstrate Plato’s four cardinal virtues
    • distinguish four stages of the truth in the theory of knowledge
    • discuss a connection between virtue and happiness in Plato’s conception of the virtues
    • to synthesize the different views of other scholars to draw the effective conclusion

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • indicate a distinction between philosophic virtue and customary virtue
    • analyze the key concepts such as justice, wisdom, courage and temperance in Virtues Ethics
    • compare and contrast the central thesis of Socrates’ ethics is ‘knowledge is virtue’ and Plato’s ‘virtue is knowledge’
    • survey some ancient “eudaimonistic” versions of virtue ethics and explore some recent developments, investigate some key objections and criticisms, and examine some applied issues.
    REFERENCES

    1. Gonslaves, M. A. (1989). Right and Reason. Merrill Publishing Company.
    2. Gould, J. A., (1989). Classic Philosophical Questions. Macmillan Publishing Company.
    3. Hintz, H. W. (1959). Knowledge and Value. Harcourt, Brace & World Inc.
    4. Solomon, H. W. (1996). A Handbook of Ethics. Harcourt, Brace & Company.
    5. Thiroux, H. W. (1985). Philosophy: Theory and Practice. Macmillan Publishing Company.

    Module No. : Phil 5206

    Module Name : Selected Philosophical Writings-I

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to provide the main lines of thought from Western Philosophers’ original writings in epistemology. This course emphasizes on theory of knowledge subtracted from the original works of ancient to contemporary philosophers.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Truth and Knowledge
    1.1. Plato: Truth as Extra-Sensible Reality
    1.2. A.J. Ayer: Sense-Experience as the Standard of Truth
    1.3. William James: The Pragmatist’s Approach to Truth
    2. Theories of Knowledge
    2.1. Rene Descartes: Rationalism
    2.2. John Locke: Empiricism
    2.3. George Berkeley: Epistemological Idealism
    2.4. David Hume: The Empirical Grounds of Causal Reasoning
    3. Mind and Matter
    3.1. B.F. Skinner: Behaviorism
    3.2. Jean-Paul Sartre: Existentialism

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to improve understanding about theory of truth, theory of knowledge, mind and matter in some of the Western philosophers’ original writings
    • to become familiar with epistemological terms in Western philosophy
    • to learn how to appreciate and interpret the role of truth and knowledge
    • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
    • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
    • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • summarize with clarity and evaluate with insight some of the arguments, problems, questions, or issues central to epistemology
    • identify the recent trends of the major intellectual controversial characteristics of the Western philosophical tradition
    • discuss the generic importance of intellectual curiosity in philosophical inquiries and other academic subjects
    • construct analogies and examples to illustrate major philosophical points
    • organize the research frame logically

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • discuss some western philosopher’s approach about the question of what is truth, theory of knowledge and mind and matter
    • distinguish the role of perception and conception
    • learn the different theories of justification and how they are different
    • indicate the complexity and dynamics of even basic epistemological issues
    • explain the origins of western philosophy, showing particular awareness of the thought of Plato and Aristotle
    • distinguish what truths are known with certainty, what are known with probability and possibility and what are impossible
    REFERENCES

    1. Cohen, Eilliot D. (2000). Philosophers at Work. Second Edition, Harcourt College Publisher.
    2. Locke, John (Pringle-Pattison, A.S. trans.). (1947). An Essay concerning Human Understanding. New York: Oxford at the Clarendon Press.

    BA (Honours) Third Year (Semester-II)

    Core Courses

    Phil 5207 (4) Issues in Chinese Philosophy
    Phil 5208 (4) Issues in Western Philosophy-II
    Phil 5209 (4) Philosophy of Education-II
    Phil 5210 (4) Topics in Buddhism-II
    Phil 5211 (4) Ethics of Virtue-II (Aristotle)
    Phil 5212 (4) Selected Philosophical Writings-II

    Module No. : Phil 5207

    Module Name : Issues in Chinese Philosophy

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – The purpose of this subject is enable students to examine the synthetic ways of thinking of Eastern Philosophy. Students have to study, in the second semester, characteristic of Chinese Philosophy, stages and development of Chinese Philosophy and a general survey of Chinese Philosophical systems. In addition, students will study bloom of new schools in Chinese Philosophy.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Metaphysical Background of Chinese Philosophy
    2. Moral Problems in Chinese Philosophy
    2.1. Problem of Human Nature in Confucianism
    2.2. Problem of Human Nature in Neo-Confucianism
    3. Problems of Human Nature in Chinese Philosophy
    3.1. Problem of Human Nature in Taoism
    3.2. Problem of Human Nature in Neo-Taoism
    3.3. Problem of Human Nature in Maoism

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to achieve a direct views of metaphysical background of Chinese Philosophy
    • to improve the understanding about the problems of human nature in Chinese Philosophy schools
    • It can also challenge as any in the history of Western thought
    • It can examine the further teaching of Neo-Confucianism and Neo-Taoism in Chinese philosophy
    • It can explore some keys features of later Chinese Cosmology of Neo-Confucianism
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • understand the ethical terms in Chinese philosophy
    • differentiate various views on human nature in Chinese Philosophy
    • describe Social, Political and Philosophy are mixed in Chinese culture
    • revise the theories of human nature that were developed by Chinese thinkers and the ways in which these theories structured political, religious, and philosophical views.

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • demonstrate their knowledge of problems of Chinese philosophy
    • examine the metaphysical background of Chinese philosophy
    • indicate the general characteristics of Chinese Philosophy
    • analyze the key concepts in Chinese Philosophy
    • enhance recognition and understanding of cultural differences between China and western societies and their roots in the Chinese intellectual heritage
    REFERENCES

    1. Chai, C. & W. Chai. (1982). The Stories of Chinese Philosophy. New York: Washington Square Press.
    2. Chan, Wing-Tsit. (1963). A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    3. Fung Yu- Lan. (1981). A Short History of Chinese Philosophy. New York: The Free Press.
    4. Theodore de Bary, William. (1980). Sources of Chinese Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press.
    5. Xu Yuanxiang. (2007). Confucius: A Philosopher for the Ages. Beijing: China International Press.

    Module No. : Phil 5208

    Module Name : Issues in Western Philosophy-II

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to understand issues in Western philosophy through the study of the philosophy of some Greek and modern philosophers. The frame of this course bases on the development of reading, writing, thinking, and speaking with studying on the major works of modern philosophies. In addition, it considers some of the most important problems in the theory of knowledge and morality and the good life from a selection of classical and contemporary viewpoints.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Philosophies of Process
    2. Moore and the Revival of Realism
    3. The Nature of Truth
    4. Morality and The Good life

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to understand the nature of the issues in Western philosophy,
    • to learn thoughtfully but critically assess the arguments the students find in the philosophy of some philosophers,
    • to expand their ability of critical reasoning by studying those philosophers’ original writings,
    • to develops a sense of the value and limits of philosophy, a reflective attitude and sensitivity to the subtleties and complexities of philosophical judgments, and a life-long commitment to learning and inquiry,
    • to develop writing philosophical essays that have coherent theses and reasonable supporting arguments, and that include consideration of factors evaluating for and against different positions.
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • understand epistemological and ethical issues from different perspectives and thus to understand that different people will define issues in different ways
    • state a view fully and carefully, give reasons for that view, and defend the view against common objections, as measured by the presentations and papers.
    • summarize and explain difficult ideas and concepts using language appropriate to their studied area
    • demonstrate the ability to do original philosophical research on some issues of epistemology and ethics
    • synthesize the different views of other scholars to draw the effective conclusion

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • describe knowledge of several philosophers and classical philosophical writings, and the arguments, principles, concepts, and issues contained the course,
    • analyze philosophical texts, particularly with respect to recognizing, expressing, and evaluating arguments
    • propose a new idea from philosophical point of view by using the knowledge of the course
    • obtain the basic skills of resolving those issues, such as critical thinking, analytical and synthesis, decision-making, problem-solving, self-study, and communication skills by means of conducting the active discussion class, group work for presentation and assignment.
    REFERENCES

    1. Jones, W.T. and Robert J. Fogelin. (1998). The Twentieth Century to Quine and Derrida (Third Edition). Harcourt Brace College Publishers.
    2. Solomon, Robert C. (1998). The Big Questions (Fifth Edition). Harcourt Brace College Publishers.

    Module No. : Phil 5209

    Module Name : Philosophy of Education -II

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to provide students with an overview of the most important some significant western educational theories that have been put forward as extensions of, or alternatives. This course is to arrive at a clear understanding of the significant some educational philosophers who have suggested a responsible eclecticism in building a personal philosophy of education. In addition, the course will provide the theories of pragmatists, existentialists, marxists and reconstructionists who advocated an attitude toward change that encourages individuals to try to make life better than it was or is. Moreover, students will have a chance to study some skills which are demanded in 21st Century educational system such as ‘self-study’, ‘creative’, ‘cooperative’, and ‘critical’ can be cultivated students to be active learners by philosophy of education.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Pragmatism and Education
    2. Existentialism, Phenomenology, and Education
    3. Analytic Philosophy and Education
    4. Reconstructionism and Education
    5. Behaviourism and Education
    6. Marxism and Education
    7. Philosophy, the Theory and Practice of Education

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to evaluate systematic reflection upon general theories
    • to learn how to develop the knowledge, skills, or characters of students
    • to synthesis of educational facts with educational values
    • to provide a view of social transformation and promotes a view of purposeful human action to carry through on that transformation
    • it challenges students to engage in critical thinking, to rethink assumptions and resist dogmatism or pat answers
    • to improve the sense of interdisciplinary approach through the presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • apply their subject analytically and comprehensively
    • discuss the different significances of western educational theories in education
    • develop their critical skills and analytical skills
    • select which educational methods are suitable to do the effective study in this course
    • discuss philosophy of education from different perspectives to the strength and weakness of each system

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • differentiate the different concepts inherent in the western point of view, such as aim, methods, curriculum and critique of eastern philosophies in education
    • reproduce a new perspective to recommend the further studies about education
    • make their new trend to present new ideas
    • synthesize the different views to draw the effective conclusion
    • construct own assumptions to suitable system for the students in line with the 21st Century skills
    REFERENCES

    1. Gutek, Gerald L. (1997). Historical And Philosophical Foundations of Education A Biographical Introduction. New Jersey: Merrill, an important of Prentice Hall.
    2. Hamm, Cornel M. (1989). Philosophical Issues in Education: An Introduction. New York: The Flamer Press.
    3. Kneller, George F. (1986). Introduction To The Philosophy Of Education. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
    4. Knowles, Richard T and Mc Learn, George. (1992). Psychological Foundations of Moral Education And Character Development: An Integrated Theory of Moral Development. Washington: Library of Congress Cataloging-in- Publication.
    5. Mclean, George F. (1991). Chinese Foundations for Moral Education And Character Development. Washington: Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication.
    6. Mujibul Hasan Siddiqui. (2016). Philosophical And Sociological Foundations Of Education. New Delhi: A P H Publishing Corporation.
    7. Olson, Ivan (2000). The Arts and Critical Thinking in American Education. London: An Important of Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc.
    8. Ozmon, Howard A. & Samuel M. Craver. (1986). Philosophical Foundations of Education. London: Merrill Publishing Company.
    9. Sharma, Promila. (2013). Philosophy of Education. New Delhi: A P H Publishing Corporation.
    10. Tubbs, Nigel. (2004). Philosophy’s Higher Education. New York: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Module No. : 5210

    Module Name : Topics in Buddhism-II

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to understand a broad view to schools of Buddhist thought, teachings, philosophical concepts and aesthetic evaluation of Buddhist Arts. It covers keys aspects of Theravada Buddhist thought and practice. This course will also provide an overview of Buddhism as it becomes increasingly influential in the modern world, including the areas of art, architecture, science, politics, and culture.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Schools of Buddhist Thought
    2. Main Themes of Buddhist Teachings
    2.1. The Doctrine of Two Extremes and 62 Brahmanic Views of Ancient India
    2.2. The Doctrine of Middle Way
    3. Philosophical Concepts in Buddha’s Teachings
    4. Aesthetic Evaluation of Buddhist Arts

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to describe the schools of Buddhist thought, main themes, philosophical concepts and practice of Buddhism
    • to learn textual and architecture in the context of wider knowledge of Buddhism
    • to evaluate several issues in literature, history, doctrine and practice in Buddhism
    • to apply the practices and teachings of the Buddha from 2500 years ago, and how these are relevant today in order to work with mind and to show up more fully in daily life
    • to awaken, encourage or nourish in students a love of peace and truth for their own sake and a desire to live in a better world, free from suffering, now and in the future.
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • describe what Buddhism and its teaching are and how to implement them into daily lives
    • demonstrate the different schools of Buddhism and how they are different
    • discuss the understanding about the complexity and dynamic of basic issues about way of life
    • construct artistic views based on Buddhist Arts
    • reproduce their ability of critical reasoning and thus be able to become reflective citizens of the twenty-first century multi-cultural society

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

  • indicate the Buddhist teaching and practices, allowing us to understand how these teachings shaped the ways people since ancient time and interacted with their world
  • analyze the meaning of life, the nature of the Law of Kamma and its Implications in Social life
  • evaluate aesthetic value of Buddhist Arts
  • obtain the basic skills of 21st century higher education students such as critical thinking, analytical and synthesis, decision-making, problem-solving, self-study, and communication skills by means of conducting the active tutorial and discussion class, group work for presentation and assignment.
  • REFERENCES

    1. Chatterjee, S. (1960). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy. Calcutta: Calcutta University Press.
    2. Dasgupta, Surama. (1965). Development of Moral Philosophy in India. New York: Unbar Publishing Co.
    3. Radhakrishnan, S. (1953). History of Philosophy: Eastern and Western. Vol. I. London: Unwin Brothers.
    4. Radhakrishnan, S. (1957). A Source Book in Indian Philosophy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Module No. : Phil 5211

    Module Name : Ethics of Virtue-II (Aristotle)

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – The purpose of this course is to provide the synthetic ways of Aristotle’s Virtue Ethics. It surveys the essential content of the philosophies of Aristotle and considers more briefly some of the earlier thinkers whose ideas set the context for their works. It examines the history of virtue ethics, one of the major traditions in ethical theory. Virtue ethics is a theory that emphasizes the goodness or badness of those who act, rather than the rightness or wrongness of particular actions. This course focuses on knowledge and virtue of Aristotle’s philosophy.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. A General Study of Aristotle’s Philosophy
    2. Aristotle’s View on Knowledge and Virtue
    2.1. Aristotle’s Conception of Knowledge
    2.2. Aristotle’s Conception of Virtue

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to understand the nature of virtue ethics and virtue theory
    • to achieve a direct views of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics
    • to develop the evaluating about the Ethical concepts of Virtues and Vices
    • to explore good moral character bears an especially close relation to human happiness, or the ability to construct a meaningful human life.
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • understand Aristotle’s knowledge and virtues broadly
    • distinguish virtue in particular and virtue in general
    • explain the virtues are at a middle ground between excess and deficiency
    • compare Aristotle’s own philosophical system, with a focus on the ways in which it is similar to and different from Plato’s,
    • integrate set of ideas about the fundamental nature of reality, man, knowledge, and value in Aristotle’s philosophy.

    The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • indicate what is virtues and vices in Aristotle’s virtues ethics
    • analyze the key concept of Aristotle’s Virtue Ethics
    • discuss the idea that virtue is primarily a matter of good upbringing and becomes second nature
    • trace the concept of virtue through several important Platonic dialogues before investigating the ethical system of Aristotle presented in his Nicomachean Ethics,
    • survey some ancient “eudaimonistic” versions of virtue ethics and explore some recent developments, investigate some key objections and criticisms, and examine some applied issues.
    REFERENCES

    1. Gonslaves, M. A. (1989). Right and Reason. Merrill Publishing Company.
    2. Gould, J. A. (1989). Classic Philosophical Questions. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
    3. Hintz, H. W. (1959). Knowledge and Value. Harcourt, Brace & World Inc.
    4. Solomon, R. C. (1996). A Handbook of Ethics. Harcourt, Brace & Company.
    5. Thiroux, J. P. (1985). Philosophy: Theory and Practice. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

    Module No. : Phil 5212

    Module Name : Selected Philosophical Writings-II

    TOTAL HOURS : (75) Hours

    Lecture : (3) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(45) Hours
    Tutorial/Discussion : (2) Hours per Week * (15) Weeks=(30) Hours

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    – This course aims to provide the main lines of thought from Western Philosophers’ original writings in ethics. In addition, the course will provide an orientation about the meanings of the good, the end, moral virtue, friendship and happiness in Aristotle’s original writings and the more understanding of the concept of moral values and rules from some of the Western Philosophers’ original writings.
    – The frame of the course bases on the topics of;
    1. Virtue Ethics (Aristotle)
    1.1. The Nicomachean Ethics (Book I- The End)
    1.2. The Nicomachean Ethics (Book II- Moral Virtue)
    1.3. The Nicomachean Ethics (Book VIII- Why we need friendship)
    1.4. The Nicomachean Ethics (Book X – Happiness)
    2. Moral Sense Ethics
     David Hume- A Treatise of Human Nature
    (Moral Distinctions Derived from a Moral Sense)
    3. Naturalism and Anti-naturalism
    3.1. G. E. Moore- Principia Ethica (Chapter I- The Subject Matter of Ethics)
    3.2. John Dewey- Reconstruction in Philosophy (Reconstruction in Moral conception)
    4. Ludwig Wittgenstein- A Lecture on Ethics
    5. Existentialist Ethics
    5.1. Sǿren Kierkegaard
    5.2. Friedrich Nietzsche
    5.3. Jean-Paul Sartre

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    The main objectives of this course are

    • to improve the understanding about ethics in some of the Western philosophers’ selected writings
    • to become familiar with the terms of moral values in ethics
    • to learn how to appreciate and interpret the concept of ethics
    • it is designed to help students to be upgraded their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening
    • it challenges students to engage in creative thinking and critical thinking skills through the group works in writing assignment or initiative discussion in the classroom
    • to improve the sense of self-study and pro-active thinking, classroom atmosphere will be put emphasis on presentation and assignment which necessarily linked with data collection from survey (literature or observation)
    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    – The generic learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • describe the main lines of thought of selected philosophical writing
    • distinguish between our actions can be praiseworthy and blameworthy
    • reproduce on and evaluate ethical arguments from diverse sources in order to communicate effectively with others who might have a different opinion from one’s own,
    • discuss about our good life which is based on our rational faculties,
    • make the philosophical assumptions that are rooted in moral ideas and in philosophical works in order to define one’s moral responsibility in contemporary society.

    – The specific learning outcomes
    After this study, students will be able to

    • think about our actions and decide rationally on the best course of action
    • employ theories of professional ethics and responsibility to evaluate choices, actions and consequences in professional life
    • compare and contrast the core of ethical problems, issues or questions by referencing the inquiry to some philosophers
    • explain moral virtues are not ends in themselves but a necessary preconditions for living a good life
    • initiate their new approaches to study successful life from philosophical point of view
    REFERENCES

    1. Hume, David. (1740). A Treatise of Human Nature. London: Wm. Collins Sons & Co, Ltd.
    2. Johnson, Oliver A. (1999) Ethics (Selections from Classical and Contemporary Writers). Harcourt Brace College Publishers.
    2. Warnock Mary. (1967). Existentialist Ethics. London: Macmillan.

    MA First Year (Semester-I)

    Phil 611 – Logic and Research Methodology    (Core)

    Phil 612 – Social Philosophy             (Core)

    Phil 613 – Axiological Studies            (Core)

    Phil 614 – Special Topics in Eastern Philosophy       (Core)

    MA First Year (Semester-II)

    Phil 621 – Philosophy of Science            (Core)

    Phil 622 – Philosophy of Historical Studies             (Core)

    Phil 623 – Philosophy of Culture             (Core)

    Phil 624 – Special Topics in Western Philosophy             (Core)

     

    MA Second Year (Semester-I)

    Phil 631 – Seminar-I             (Core)

    Phil 632 – Seminar-II            (Core)

    Phil 633 – Research and Progress Report            (Core)

    Phil 634 – Research Outline and their Presentation             (Core)

    MA Second Year (Semester-II)

    Phil 641 – Research and Seminar           (Core)

    Phil 642 – Thesis and Viva Voce             (Core)

     

    MA (Qualifying) (Semester-I)

    Phil 5201 – Issues in Indian Philosophy             (Core)

    Phil 5202 – Issues in Western Philosophy -I             (Core)

    Phil 5203 – Philosophy of Education-I             (Core)

    Phil 5204 – Topics in Buddhism-I                         (Core)

    Phil 5205 – Ethics of Virtue-I (Plato)            (Core)

    Phil 5206 – Selected Philosophical Writing-I           (Core)

    MA (Qualifying) (Semester-II)

    Phil 5207 – Issues in Chinese Philosophy             (Core)

    Phil 5208 – Issues in Western Philosophy -II           (Core)

    Phil 5209 – Philosophy of Education-II             (Core)

    Phil 5210 – Topics in Buddhism-II             (Core)

    Phil 5211 – Ethics of Virtue-II (Aristotle)           (Core)

    Phil 5212 – Selected Philosophical Writing-II             (Core)

    PhD PRELIMINARY COURSE

    Phil 711 – Traditional Culture of the East and West                (Core)

    Phil 712 – Philosophical Anthropology                                       (Core)

    Phil 713 – Culture, Language and Art                                         (Core)

    Phil 714 – Mythology, Culture and Religion                              (Core)

    FIELDS OF RESEARCH FOR

    POSTGRADUATE COURSE (MASTER AND DOCTORAL)

    (depends on the choice of candidates)

     

    (1)   Metaphysics

    • Philosophy of Science
    • Mind and Body
    • Study of Metaphysical Theories
    • Metaphysical Concepts

     

    (2)   Epistemology

    • Logic, Analytical Philosophy and Cognitive Science
    • Mind and Body
    • Study of Knowledge
    • Study of Epistemological Theories

     

    (3)   Value Study

    • Ethics
    • Aesthetics

     

    (4)    Social and Political Philosophy

    • Philosophy of Education
    • Philosophy of Law
    • Feminism
    • Social Philosophy in Literature
    • Political Concepts

     

    (5)    Philosophy of Culture

    • Philosophy of Religion
    • Philosophical Anthropology
    • Folklore
    • Literature

     

    (6)   Comparative Philosophy