Brief Background of the Department of International Relations

The University of Yangon (formerly Rangoon) is the oldest and the most renowned university in Myanmar.  To prepare for setting up a Department for International Relations in 1955 many Myanmar scholars were sent to visit the most famous universities in the United Kingdom and the United States to observe their courses on International Relations.  At the same time, advice was taken from selected Myanmar scholars from the University’s own Department of Modern History and Political Science, the most relevant department to inform International Relations. In 1958, a Board of Studies for International Relations was officially formed with professors from the Departments of Modern History and Political Science, Geography, Geology, Social Science and with other visiting foreign professors.  The first two-year post graduate programme for International Relations was introduced in the Department of Modern History and Political Science which came under the Social Science faculty at the University of Rangoon. Later, the post graduate diploma programme in International Relations was extended to offer a Bachelor’s degree programme, Bachelor Honors degree programme and Master’s programme. The medium of instruction was English, as in all courses at the University.

In 1964, in the context of a new education plan, all courses taught in the English language had to be offered in Myanmar language.  Some of the subjects offered at the University were impossible to teach in Myanmar language so they were suspended. International Relations was one of the subjects suspended at the then Rangoon University of Arts and Science (RASU).

Fortunately in 1982-1983 a new policy for higher education came in, stipulating that all disciplines at university and college levels were to be offered in English language except Myanmar literature. Consequently, International Relations was reintroduced at the university, having been suspended for fifteen years.  Many senior lecturers from the Department of History at RASU and Mandalay University were selected to study the teaching methodology, curricula and contents of syllabi concerning International Relations subjects at universities in Germany, the United Kingdom, the United States and Japan. During the vacation period of 1983, a refresher training course for International Relations was conducted for young faculty members under the intensive guidance of senior Professors and lecturers at RASU.Departments of International Relations were reintroduced in 1983 at RASU and Mandalay University. Demand for International Relations subject was high despite limited human resources in the departments of both universities.   So, each university accepted 100 students who were selected based on two criteria: a high total in their matriculation exam and 65 for English.  Then every selected student had to sit for an interview and a psychological test.  Students who were admitted to study International Relations earned a high total score and the subject was rated highly, alongside other subjects such as medicine, technology and economics in Myanmar.The Thirty Year Education Plan was introduced in the academic year 1995-1996, with the combination system:  a combination of arts subjects and a combination of science subjects for high school students, especially for Grades 8, 9 and 10. Under the 8 sets of combinations for the matriculation exam, only those students who took History at Grade 9 and Grade 10 could apply for International Relations.   The combination system was a barrier for some subjects at university level education.From 1996 to 2011, the Department of International Relations’ intake was low and few students graduated.  Students were also reluctant to take this subject because of the language barrier.  Following democratisation in Myanmar in 2011-2012, the combination system was decentralized with some minor restrictions and students who passed their matriculation exam with an all arts combination could apply to read International Relations.A PhD programme in International Relations was introduced in 1999. From 1999 to April 2017, the Department of International Relations produced 49 PhD degree holders, in various fields of International Relations.  The Department is currently staffed by 26 faculty members, running both  International  Relations and Political Science disciplines.

A new undergraduate interdisciplinary course, B.A (ASEAN Studies), was introduced with the support of all arts subjects.  It extended its area of study to Southeast Asia and the Pacific (SEAP) and about 120 students obtained B.A (SEAP Studies) in 2005-2006 before that degree programme was unfortunately suspended.

To fulfil the needs of community and State, a post graduate Diploma in International Relations (DIR) was launched in 2003.  A Diploma in Political Science (DPS) was introduced in June 2013 at the request of the Hluttaws (Parliaments) and public.

Following the significant change in 2012 when the University of Yangon reopened for undergraduate classes, the Department of International Relations offered a new discipline, Political Science.  Criteria for student selection for the two courses now offered differ.  International Relations requires a total score of 470 in the matriculation exam, and 65 for English.  Aspiring Political Science students must have total of 420 in their matriculation exam, and 60 for English. Hopefully, a new selection policy will be introduced as the university gains greater autonomy under higher education reforms since 2013.

The Department of International Relations is currently headed by Professor Dr Chaw Chaw Sein, since 2006.

Managing challenges during Myanmar’s transition

Friday 5 July and Saturday

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Research Projects for the Department of Higher Education since 2010

  1. A Decade of Myanmar-China Trade Relations (1998-2008)
  2. The Role of US in Northeast Asia after the Cold War
  3. ASEAN-Japan Economic Relations in the Post Cold War Era
  4. Political Problems and Challenges in Pakistan
  5. Patterns of Indonesia’s Foreign Policy (1945-2009)
  6. Globalization Impact on Myanmar’s Culture
  7. Asian’s Efforts to Combat Terrorism
  8. Relations between Japan and New ASEAN Members
  9. Analyzing Myanmar’s Democratic Transition in the Regional Context

 

Departmental Research Projects since 2010

  1. International Response to Iran Nuclear Issue
  2. Financial Crises and Impacts on Global Economy
  3. The Role of Japan in the Middle East Conflict
  4. Community Resilience in Climate Change Adaption in Ayeyarwaddy Delta
  5. Bringing the Excellence Back In: Challenges, Tasks and Strategies of Higher Education Reform in the New Myanmar

 

Asia Research Projects (ARC) since 2010

  1. A Comparative Study of the Status of Women between Republic of Korea and Myanmar
  2. Myanmar’s Cooperation in the Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC)
  3. Myanmar-Singapore Relations
  4. Myanmar’s Reform and Its Impact on Myanmar-China Relations
  5. Foreign Investment in Oil and Gas sector in Myanmar
  6. Indo-US Relations: Indo-US Nuclear Deal and Its Impact

 

Research Projects in Universities Research Journal since 2010

  1. Trade Policy Reforms in Myanmar (1988-2010)
  2. Assessing Foreign Aid Policy Orientation towards Myanmar

 

Research Projects in Yangon University Research Journal

  1. Law of the Sea (UNCLOS III) in Territorial Sea Making: Myanmar
  2. The Taiwan Issue in Sino-US Relations
  3. A Study on China’s Strategies towards Southeast Asia
  4. Rehabilitation in Nargis Cyclone Affected Areas in Ayeyarwaddy Region
  5. Bandwaggoning on Rising Regional Powers: A Study on Geostrategic Position of Myanmar between China and India
  6. Refugee Issues in the Context of Myanmar-Thai Relations
  7. Nation Building Theory: A Case Study in Myanmar
  8. Myanmar Thai Cooperation since 1988: Drug Issues
  9. Myanmar Efforts to Control Illicit Drugs 1998-2015

 

Research Projects in Myanmar Academy of Arts and Science Research Journal (MAAS) since 2010

  1. The Sunshine Policy and the Process of Korea Reunification
  2. The Role of UNEP Environmental Issues: Climate Change
  3. The Role of INGOs for the Development of Health Sector in Myanmar: Save the Children (Myanmar)
  4. ASEAN Cooperation in Transportation towards Regional Integration
  5. Global Food Security in the 21st Century
  6. The Significance of UN Conferences on Climate Change
  7. Economic Development of Vietnam: Integration into Global Economy since 1997
  8. The Spratly Islands Dispute
  9. Global Water Scarcity in the 21st Century
  10. Myanmar-US Relations before & after 2010
  11. Japan’s Bid to UN Security Council Reform
  12. Natural Disaster Management in Southeast Asia
  13. Myanmar-China Tourism Development Cooperation
  14. Myanmar-IMF Relations: Channeling the Reform Momentum
  15. Myanmar – Japan Relations (1962-1974)
  16. Myanmar-Thai Cooperation in Migrant Workers Issues
  17. Defence Policy Priorities of China and India: Implication for Myanmar
  18. Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) Development Assistance to Myanmar after 2010
  19. The Closer Cooperation between Myanmar and Thailand in the Context of Dawei Special Economic Zone Project
  20. A Study on Myanmar News in International Media (2010-2015)
  21. Myanmar’s Political Reform under the New Civilian Government and Its Impact on Myanmar-China Relations
  22. Changing European Union Policy on Myanmar after 2010
  23. Japan’s Search for Normalcy: Japan’s Policy in Southeast Asia after the Cold War

 

Research Projects Published in International Research Journals since 2010

  1. Political Relations between Myanmar and India
  2. Institutions in Myanmar’s 2015 Election: Union Election Commission , International Agencies and the Military
  3. Myanmar Foreign Policy under New Government: Changes and Prospects
  4. Conflict Management and Peace Making in Myanmar: Efforts and Effects
  5. Myanmar’s Reforms and Opening the New Chapter with Japan
  6. Myanmar Peace Process Beyond the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement 2015
  7. A Comparative Study of State-led Development in Myanmar (1988-2010) and Suharot’s Indonesia: A Developmental State Theory
  8. Politics of Development in Myanmar (1988-2009): Comparison with Indonesia under Suharto’s New Order
  9. Assessing the Context of Governance and Developmental State in Myanmar (1988-2010)
  10. State Building in Myanmar (1988-2010) and Suharto’s Indonesia: A Study of Building a Democratic Developmental State in Myanmar

 

Selected Ph D Dissertations at the Department of International Relations since 2011

  1. Myanmar- Israel Relations Since 1954
  2. Economic Integration in East Asia Community
  3. Myanmar’s Endeavour to Ensure Food Security Since 1988
  4. Myanmar-Japan Economic Cooperation
  5. Cooperation between Myanmar and ASEAN for Social Development
  6. The Role of Non-Governmental Organizations in HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care in Myanmar
  7. Cooperation in Drug Control in Golden Triangle Region Since 1988
  8. A Comparative Study of China and Japan’s Developmental Assistance Towards Myanmar Since 1988
  9. Development of Myanmar Marine Sector After 1988
  10. Myanmar Participation in the Non-Aligned Movement Since 1961
  11. Democratization and Its Implications in Myanmar
  12. The Role of UNHCR in Conflict Management in Northern Rakhine State

1. Regional & International Organizations
2. Gender and Politics
3. Peace and Security
4. Foreign Policy & Foreign Relations
5. Comparative Politics
6. Governance and Public Policy

Inbound and outbound students

2013 was a remarkable year for the University of Yangon. The university re-opened for undergraduate students and programmes, which had been closed since 1996 by the military government. Following the 2010 general election, Myanmar re-joined the international community taking its first steps towards transforming the country into a democratic state, using the seven-step road map. Since then, the University of Yangon (YU) has had many opportunities to collaborate with universities around the world. While previously student exchange programmes had only been possible under the ASEAN University Network, now YU has signed Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) with more than fifty universities from Australia, Japan, China, Korea, UK, and Germany among others. Under these MoU, student exchanges, faculty exchanges, seminars, workshops, research and visiting professor progammes are all carried out.
Several overseas students especially from China, Japan, and Korea learn Myanmar language at the Myanmar (Burmese) Department. There are also overseas students studying at the Department of International Relations under student exchange programmes. Yangon University has been receiving inbound as well as sending outbound students since the University re-opened for undergraduate programmes in 2013. The list of outbound and inbound students of the Department of IR can be seen below:

Table 1: List of outbound students

Source: Compiled by the author from student application

Table 2: List of Inbound students/researchers

Source: Compiled by the author from student enrolment at the department

Curriculum

B.A First Year ( IR Specialization ) (Semester I)

Foundation Courses

မြန်မာစာ-၁၀၀၂ (3) မြန်မာစာ

Eng 1001  – (3) English

Core Courses

IR 1101 –     (4) International Relations in Political Thought I

IR 1102 –     (4) Introduction to International Relations I

* Elective Courses

Geog 1003 –   (3) Geography of Southeast Asian Countries

Hist 1003 –     (3) World History to 1500 I

AM 1001 –     (3) Aspects of Myanmar

*A student must take one course (3 credits), and can choose one elective (3 credits) offered by the Department of Myanmar, Geography and History.

 

IR-1101  International Relations in Political Thought I

Course Description

This course aims to introduce students to political thought of various philosophers including western and non-western thinkers as well as classical and modern thinkers. Students will be familiar with famous political thinkers’ different perspectives on human nature, society, justification of government and state, citizenships, liberty, justice, morality, war and peace.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, students will be able

  • to interpret, analyse and evaluate the arguments of the thinkers
  • to take their own position and stands on these debated issues.

Class organisation

This course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, nearly three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be classwork.

Grading

Class Work

Students will be assessed on their participation and attendance in lectures. There will be one-time group presentation (three/four in each group). Students will individually need to submit an essay in which main arguments and thought of two or more thinkers on same issues are critically examined and analyzed in comparative way. Students have to sit three tutorial tests. All class activities will be worth 35 of the students overall final grade.

Class Participation                             5

Tutorial                                                10

Presentation                                        10

Academic Essay                                 10

Class Work Total                               35

 Final Exam

There will be final exam at the end of all lectures. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 of the overall course grade.

 

IR-1102 Introduction to International Relations I

Course Description

The course aims to understand the basic concepts of International Relations among nation-states. The course will describe the linkages of conflict and cooperation between states. The course will also explain significant elements of national power and the nature of foreign policy and diplomacy.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

– to explore different types of state, nation and nation-state in modern state system

– to clarify elements of national power

-to analyze decision making actors and process through the nature of foreign policies

-to examine the criteria of diplomats through learning diplomacy

Class Organization: The course is divided into sixteen weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be classwork.

Readings: There are articles and textbook chapters assigned each week which will be provided with handouts.

 Grading

Classwork (Attendance and Presentations)

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in reading circles. All class activities and attendance will be worth 35 of the students overall final grade.

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The Final exam will be comprehensive (i.e.., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 of the overall course grade.

 

B.A  First Year ( IR Specialization ) (Semester II)

Foundation Courses
မြန်မာစာ-၁၀၀၂ (3) မြန်မာစာ
Eng 1002 – (3) English

Core Courses
IR 1103 – (4) International Relations in Political Thought II
IR 1104 – (4) Introduction to International Relations II
* Elective Courses
Geog 1004 – (3) Geography of Myanmar
Hist 1006 – (3) World History to 1500 II
AM 1002 – (3) Aspects of Myanmar

*A student must take one course (3 Credits) and can choose one elective (3 Credits ) offered by the Department of Myanmar, Geography and History .

 

IR- 1103: International Relations in Political Thought II

Course Description

This course aims to introduce students to political thought of various philosophers including western and non-western thinkers as well as classical and modern thinkers. Students will be familiar with famous political thinkers’ different perspectives on human nature, society, justification of government and state, citizenships, liberty, justice, morality, war and peace.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able

  • to interpret, analyse and evaluate the arguments of the thinkers
  • to take their own position and stands on these debated issues.

Class organisation

This course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, nearly three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be class work.

Grading

Class Work

Students will be assessed on their participation and attendance in lectures. There will be one-time group presentation (three/four in each group). Students will individually need to submit an essay in which main arguments and thought of two or more thinkers on same issues are critically examined and analyzed in comparative way. Students have to sit three tutorial tests. All class activities will be worth 35 of the students overall final grade.

Class Participation                             5

Tutorial                                               10

Presentation                                        10

Academic Essay                                 10

Class Work Total                               35

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam at the end of all lectures. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

 

IR 1104- Introduction to International Relations II

Course Description

The course aims to focus on numerous elements of economic and military aspect of International Relations. The course will deal with major threats to global security during the post-cold war era. The course will also explore the salient features of non-state actors in International Relations which involve Regional and International organizations and International Non-governmental Organizations/Non-governmental Organizations (INGOs/NGOs).

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to analyze the essential role of economic and military factors in International Relations
  • to identify major threats to the international security after the Cold War
  • to examine important functions of non-state actors in International Relations

Class Organization: The course is divided into sixteen weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be classwork.

Readings: There are articles and textbook chapters assigned each week which will be provided on handouts.

Grading

Classwork (tutorials, presentations, quiz)

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in reading circles. All class activities and attendance will be worth 35 marks of the students overall final grade.

Final Exam

There will be final exam at the end of all lectures. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

B.A Second Year ( IR Specialization ) (Semester I)

Core Courses

IR 2101 – (4) Elements of Political Institutions I

IR 2102 – (4) Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia I

IR 2103 – (4) Post World War II International Relations

⃰ Elective Courses

Eco 2001 – (3) Principles of Economics

Law 2001- (3) Study of Law

Hist 2001-World History 1900

⃰ A student must choose any two elective courses offered by the Department of Economics, Law and History.

IR 2101     Elements of Political Institutions I

Course Description

The course aims to study the introduction of the nature, classification, functions of different political institutions. It will focus on types of constitution, state systems, and interactive relations between political institutions. Three branches of government (legislative, executive, and judiciary) will also be studied in the course.

Learning Outcomes

  • to understand the basic concepts of political institutions
  • to examine the specific role and essential functions of state, constitution and government
  • to analyze the differences and significances of political institutions in different political system

Class organization

The course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be assigned for presentation and quiz.

Grading

Classwork (Presentation, Assignment, quiz)                         35%

Final Exam Paper                                                                   65%

Final Exam

There will be a final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall grade course.

Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, quiz, tutorial, and their participation in group presentation in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students’ overall final grade.

 

IR 2102           Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia I

 

Course Description

This course will introduce the students to study the politics of the Southeast Asia region and regionalism, the role of international actors in SEA and the cold war in SEA. It aims to provide students with the understanding of domestic politics in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei countries. The system of governance, the party and electoral system, and an assessment of the state will be analyzed in each country. This course will also examine the socio-political, economic trends and developments, foreign policy of each country and their foreign relations with major powers such as US, China and Japan.

Learning Outcomes

  • to evaluate the process of political change and transition in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei
  • to analyse key trends of political and economic development in those countries

Class Organization

The course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be assigned for group activities, presentation and tutorials.

Grading

Class Work (Presentation/Assignment/Tutorials)                            35%

Final Exam Paper                                                                               65%

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 % of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, tutorials and their participation in group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

IR 2103           Post World War II International Relations

 

Course Description

The course is designed to introduce the history of international relations after the Second World War. It aims to examine conflicts and cooperation between the two blocs that characterized a bipolar system. The main idea of the course is that the two superpowers confronted one another, the United States and the Soviet Union, although there was disagreement about whether this had led to peace and stability or to rising tension and insecurity.

Learning Outcomes

  • to identify and discuss key concepts in Post-World War II International Relations
  •  to analyze specific issues, events and processes in global politics

Class Organization

The course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to   interactive lectures and two hours will be assigned for group activities, presentation and tutorials.

Grading

Class Work (Presentation/Assignment/Tutorials)                            35%

Final Exam Paper                                                                               65%

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 % of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, tutorials and their participation in group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

B.A Second Year ( IR Specialization )  (Semester II)

Core Courses

IR 2104 – (4) Elements of Political Institutions II

IR 2105 – (4) Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia II

IR 2106 – (4) Post-Cold War II International Relations

⃰ Elective Courses

Eco 2002 – (3) International Trade

Law 2006 – (3) Introduction to International Law

Hist 2004 – (3) World History 1900

⃰ A student must choose any two elective courses offered by the Department of Economics, Law and History.

 

IR 2104       Elements of Political Institutions II

Course Description

This course aims to explore how the concepts of political institutions come to be essential in democratic countries.  It will analyze the differences of party systems in democratic countries which have various types of elections, voting system in particular institutions. It will also examine the role of citizenships, civil society and media which are major parts of political institutions in democratic countries.

Learning Outcomes

 After ending the course, the students will assess

-To understand the basic concepts of political institutions

-To criticize the differences of the party systems, elections system and voting system

-To explore the important of citizenships, civil society and media

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. Three hours will be taken for the lecture time and two hours will be had for other class activities during each week.

Grading:

  1. a) Exam Marks  65 marks
  2. b) Class activity (attendance, discussion and assignment, etc.)              35 marks

Final Exam

After ending the semester, all course descriptions will be completed for the final exam which is worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Class participation (attendance, tutorial, discussion, presentation and assignment) is important for a student. Grade will be depended on the student’s activities. Plagiarism is strongly limited in the paper.

IR-2105-Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia II

Course Description

This course will introduce the students to the overview politics of the Southeast Asia region and regionalism, the international actors in SEA and the cold war in SEA. This course aims to provide students with the understanding of domestic politics in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and the Philippines countries. Each country study includes an analysis of the system of governance, the party and electoral system, and an assessment of the state. This course will also examine the socio-political, economic trends and developments, foreign policy and foreign relations to the larger powers of the US, China and Japan.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will evaluate the process of political change and transition with the key trends and development in the Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and the Philippines politics.

Class Organization: The course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, it will consist of interactive lectures, group activities, presentation and tutorials.

Grading

Class Work (Presentations/Assignment/Tutorials and Attendance)                                     35

Final Exam Paper                                                                                                       65

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

IR 2106         Post-Cold War International Relations

 Course Description

This course aims to understand the nature of Cold War, major causes for the outbreak of cold war and the consequences of the Cold War. It will also focus on the role of external powers in the domestic affairs of a country and the unipolar world order which arise after the end of the cold war will be introduced. Students will learn what polarity is, what it means by uni-polarity and the pros and cons of the unipolar world order.

Learning Outcomes

  • to understand the basic concepts of the International relations in the post-cold war era
  • to analyze the changes in post-cold war period of International Relations
  • to explore the important in new ideas and theories after the cold war

Class Organization

The course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. Three hours will be devoted to the interactive lectures and two hours will be taken for group discussion and assignment in each week.

Grading:

Class work (discussion and assignment)                   35 %

Exam Marks                                                                    65 %

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 % of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, tutorials, assignments and their participation in group presentation in tutorial time. All class activities and attendance will be worth 35 % of the students overall final grade.

B.A Third Year  ( IR Specialization ) (Semester I)

 

Core Courses

IR 3101 – (4) Government and Politics of USA

IR 3102 – (4) Current Issues in International Relations

IR 3103 – (4) Government and Politics of Myanmar

Eco 3001 – (4) Economic Development

Law 3002 – (4) International Law I

* Elective Courses

IR 3104 – (3) International Relations in Middle East I

IR 3105 – (3) International Relations in Latin America

Geog 3001 – (3) Elements of Political Geography I

*A student must choose any one elective course offered by the Department of International Relations and Geography.

 

IR 3101   Government and Politics of USA

Course Description

The objective of this course is to introduce key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, characteristics of the constitutional system, Supreme Court decisions, the relationships and interactions among political institutions, and political culture of the United States. The course aims to develop critical understanding of the strengths and weakness of the American political system as well as their rights and responsibilities as citizens. This course aims to explore history, the formation of the American system and how it shapes public policy.

Learning Outcomes

            At the end of the semester, the student will be able

  • to examine civil liberty and civil rights, civic participation in a representative democracy, policy-making decision process, and the Constitution
  • to identify and explain the formation, function, players, organizations, and institutions that make up the government system of the United States system of government
  • to analyze federalism, Separation of Powers and Check, and Balance system

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two or one hours will be devoted to tutorials and discussions.

Grading

Class Room Activities           35 marks (Attendance, Tutorial, Assignment, Discussions and Presentation)

Final Exam Paper                   65 marks

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Tutorials, Mini-tests and Presentations

Tutorials will be a range of actives and will aim to increase student’s understanding of the weekly readings and key concepts. In addition, tutorials will build student’s practical skill.

 

IR 3102 Current Issues in International Relations

Course Description

The course aims to explain causes and effects of current political and economic issues in International Relations. The course will identify sources of social issues among states. The course will also explore major factors in international cooperation to settle the issues.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • define root causes of current issues in IR
  • examine the effect of current issues and their impact among countries
  • clarify the development of political, economic and social issues in IR

Class Organization

This course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures.

Readings

There are articles and textbook chapters assigned each week which will be provided on handouts.

Grading

Attendance and Presentations                                            35 marks

Final Exam                                                                             65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The Final exam will be comprehensive (i.e.., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and interactive discussion in group presentations.  Term paper will be included in 35% of the students’ overall final grade.

 

IR 3103 Government and Politics of Myanmar

Course Description

This course covers the political processes of Myanmar from the colonial period at the beginning of 1900 to current political atmosphere in Myanmar. Since Myanmar regained its independence from Britain in 1948, many challenges continue to face Myanmar, including ethnic peace, economic progress and addressing humanitarian needs. The instructor will start with the political development of Myanmar based on the religion since the early 1900s. Main areas of this course include constitutional interpretation and its implications, ethnic minority rights, faction in parties and organizations as well as the role of military in Myanmar’s politics. The basic idea of this course is to identify themes that have shaped contemporary political landscape of Myanmar. This course also discusses such factors as ethnic politics and legacies of colonial rule that Myanmar government has faced today.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able

to evaluate contemporary Myanmar politics by learning political history of Myanmar

to assess nature of political institutions and political parties in Myanmar

Class organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours lectures will be devoted to interactive learning.

Grading

Class participation (tutorial, assignments, presentation, etc)                  35 marks

Exam                                                                                                   65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The Final exam will be comprehensive (i.e.., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and interactive discussion in group presentations.  Term paper will be included in 35% of the students’ overall final grade.

*Elective Course (Major)

 

IR-3104       International Relations in Middle East I

 

Course Description

This class aims to know the students about the geopolitical locations of Middle East and the emergence of the State of Israel in 1948. After establishing the State of Israel, four major wars appeared among Arab and Israel. International organizations and super powers countries involved the affairs of Middle East but Middle East’s situations cannot settle yet. Different non-states actors evolve and the current circumstances are more complex.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

-to understand the past and present conditions in Middle East,

-to analyze the various problems in Middle East and

-to use effective methods for settling Middle East’s affairs

Class Organization

The Course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be classwork.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment, quiz)             35 marks

Final Exam paper                                                       65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive ( i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial, discussion, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

B.A Third Year ( IR Specialization ) (Semester II)

Core Courses

IR 3106 – (4) Contemporary US Foreign Policy

IR 3107 – (4) European Union

IR 3108- (4) Myanmar Foreign Relations since 1948

Eco 3002 – (4) International Finance

Law 3005 – (4) International Law II

* Elective Courses

IR  3109 – (3) International Relations in Middle East II

IR 3110 – (3 Environmental Issues

Geog 3002 – (3) Elements of Political Geography II

*A student must choose any one elective course offered by the Department of International Relations and Geography

 

IR 3106     Contemporary US Foreign Policy

 

Course Description

The prominent role of the United States and a global leader makes examining and understanding the actions that the U.S. takes toward the rest of the world and how these decisions are made important for both American and citizens of other nations alike. This course will explain and examine the contemporary United States foreign policy. It also aims to analyze history, theory, and perspectives on foreign policy issues to provide the student with a foundation for understanding the study of foreign policy and perspectives.  In general, the foreign policy of the United States includes policy decisions regarding international issues and relationships with foreign countries.

Learning Outcomes

            At the end of the semester, the student will be able

  • to understand contemporary issues in the United States foreign policy
  • to predict and prescribe for the future of the US (eg, What policies should the U.S. adopt toward current problems and crises?)
  • to study how the United States’ relationship with the world has changed over time and how world events and U.S. foreign policy have mutually influenced one another.

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two or one hours will be devoted to tutorials and discussions.

 Grading

Class Room Activities           35  marks (Attendance, Tutorial, Assignment, Discussions and Presentation)

Final Exam Paper                   65 marks 

Tutorials, Mini-tests and Presentations

Tutorials will be a range of actives and will aim to increase student’s understanding of the weekly readings and key concepts. In addition, tutorials will build student’s practical skill.

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

 

IR  3107     European Union                                                                                

Course Description

The course aims to explore the creation of new structure in Europe after the Second World War which involves in integration process of three broad areas: military, political and economic union. The course will explain major institutions of European Union and policy-making and law-making processes. The course will also review border management strategy in Europe and Beyond Brexit in the EU.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • To analyze the dominant role of European integration ideas around the world
  • to examine the economic and political importance of European Union as a group
  • to differentiate main functions of EU institutions

Class Organization

This course is divided into (16) weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures.

Readings

There are articles and textbook chapters assigned each week which will be provided on handouts.

Grading

Attendance and Presentations                                          35 marks

Final Exam                                                                             65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The Final exam will be comprehensive (i.e.., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and interactive discussion in group presentations.  Term paper will be included in 35% of the students’ overall final grade.

 

IR 3108   Myanmar Foreign Relations since 1948

 

Course Description

Foreign policy is the actions of government officials designed to promote national interests beyond a country’s territorial boundaries. The study of foreign policy and relations is an ever-changing story of how states, institutions and people engage with one another within a dynamic international system. This class will explore the nature of foreign policy and analyze the factors which determine the formulation of the foreign policy. Then, the course illustrates Myanmar’s foreign relations in regional and global context and emphasize how Myanmar maintains friendly ties with all the countries of the world since 1948.

Learning Outcomes

  At the end of the course, the students will able:

  • to understand the factors which determine the formulation of the foreign policy
  • to interpret political, economic and social cooperation may bring about more cordial and close relations between neighbors
  • to analyze the pull and push factors may affect relations between Myanmar and its counterpart countries, the cools and even strained

Class organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures.

Grading

Class Work (presentation, assignments, attendance)                                    35 marks

Final Exam                                                                                         65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

*Elective Course (Major)

IR-3109       International Relations in Middle East II

 

Course Description

This lecture aims to understand the students about the past and present situations of Middle East and how to solve the various problem of the Middle East from the United Nations and other superpower countries. What are some conflicts in Middle East? Why did great powers want to influence in Middle East? Is the United Nations effective in keeping peace in Middle East?

Learning outcomes

After finishing the lectures, students will become

-to know the various organizations in Middle East,

-to analyze the previous issues in Middle East and

-to settle the current affairs in Middle East for future peace process.

Class Organization

The Course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be classwork.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment, quiz)             35 marks

Final Exam paper                                                       65 marks

 

 Final Exam

There will be final exam in week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive ( i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial, discussion, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

B.A (HONS) First Year ( IR Specialization ) SEMESTER I

Core Courses

IR 3201 – (4) Government and Politics of USA

IR 3202 – (4) Current Issues in International Relations

R 3203 – (4) Government and Politics of Myanmar

Eco 3001 – (4) Economic Development

Law 3202 – (4) International Law I

 * Elective Courses

IR 3204 – (3) International Relations in Middle East I

IR 3205 – (3) International Relations in Latin America

Geog 3001 – (3) Elements of Political Geography I

 

*A student must choose any one elective course offered by the Department of International Relations and Geography.

 

IR 3201   Government and Politics of USA

Course Description

The objective of this course is to introduce key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, characteristics of the constitutional system, Supreme Court decisions, the relationships and interactions among political institutions, and political culture of the United States. The course aims to develop critical understanding of the strengths and weakness of the American political system as well as their rights and responsibilities as citizens. This course aims to explore history, the formation of the American system and how it shapes public policy.

Learning Outcomes

            At the end of the semester, the student will be able

  • to examine civil liberty and civil rights, civic participation in a representative democracy, policy-making decision process, and the Constitution
  • to identify and explain the formation, function, players, organizations, and institutions that make up the government system of the United States system of government
  • to analyze federalism, Separation of Powers and Check, and Balance system

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two or one hours will be devoted to tutorials and discussions.

Grading

Class Room Activities            35 marks (Attendance, Tutorial, Assignment, Discussions and Presentation)

Final Exam Paper                    65 marks

 Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Tutorials, Mini-tests and Presentations

Tutorials will be a range of actives and will aim to increase student’s understanding of the weekly readings and key concepts. In addition, tutorials will build student’s practical skill.

IR 3202 Current Issues in International Relations

 

Course Description

The course aims to explain causes and effects of current political and economic issues in International Relations. The course will identify sources of social issues among states. The course will also explore major factors in international cooperation to settle the issues.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • define root causes of current issues in IR
  • examine the effect of current issues and their impact among countries
  • clarify the development of political, economic and social issues in IR

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures.

Readings

There are articles and textbook chapters assigned each week which will be provided on handouts.

Grading

Attendance and Presentations                                                            35 marks

Final Exam                                                                              65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The Final exam will be comprehensive (i.e.., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and interactive discussion in group presentations.  Term paper will be included in 35% of the students’ overall final grade.

 

IR 3203           Government and Politics of Myanmar

Course Description

This course covers the political processes of Myanmar from the colonial period at the beginning of 1900 to current political atmosphere in Myanmar. Since Myanmar regained its independence from Britain in 1948, many challenges continue to face Myanmar, including ethnic peace, economic progress and addressing humanitarian needs. The instructor will start with the political development of Myanmar based on the religion since the early 1900s. Main areas of this course include constitutional interpretation and its implications, ethnic minority rights, faction in parties and organizations as well as the role of military in Myanmar’s politics. The basic idea of this course is to identify themes that have shaped contemporary political landscape of Myanmar. This course also discusses such factors as ethnic politics and legacies of colonial rule that Myanmar government has faced today.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able

to evaluate contemporary Myanmar politics by learning political history of Myanmar

to assess nature of political institutions and political parties in Myanmar

Class organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours lectures will be devoted to interactive learning.

Grading

Class participation (tutorial, assignments, presentation)                     35 marks

Exam                                                                                                   65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The Final exam will be comprehensive (i.e.., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and interactive discussion in group presentations.  Term paper will be included in 35% of the students’ overall final grade.

 

*Elective Course (Major)

IR-3204       International Relations in Middle East I

 

Course Description

This class aims to know the students about the geopolitical locations of Middle East and the emergence of the State of Israel in 1948. After establishing the State of Israel, four major wars appeared among Arab and Israel. International organizations and super powers countries involved the affairs of Middle East but Middle East’s situations cannot settle yet. Different non-states actors evolve and the current circumstances are more complex.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

-to understand the past and present conditions in Middle East,

-to analyze the various problems in Middle East and

-to use effective methods for settling Middle East’s affairs

Class Organization

The Course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be classwork.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment, quiz)                     35 marks

Final Exam paper                                                       65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive ( i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade

.Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial, discussion, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

* Elective Course (Minor)

IR 3002 Current issues in International Relations (Law)

Course Description

This course will discuss political, security, economic and environmental issues of the world. Firstly, this course will cover political and security issues in the world such as the security cooperation among the US, Japan and India, Russia’s interest in the Arctic Region. Secondly, this module will examine the process of economic issues such as China’s Belt and Road Initiative, US-China trade conflict and economic tension between Japan and South Korea. Thirdly, this course will explore the environmental issues in current international relations such as global warming.

Learning Outcomes

The students will be able to analyze the situations of the international community, to identify the basic concept within and between states in the current issues of International Relations. The students will have the knowledge and skills to have a broad understanding of some of the most important ideas, issues and events in international relations.

Class organization

 This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures.

Grading

Classwork (assignment, tutorial and presentation)                 35 marks

Final Exam                                                                              65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be a final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities, attendance will be worth 35 of the student’s overall final grade.

 

B.A (HONS) First Year ( IR Specialization ) SEMESTER II

Core Courses

IR 3206 – (4) Contemporary US Foreign Policy

IR 3207 – (4) European Union

R 3208- (4) Myanmar Foreign Relations since 1948

Eco 3002 – (4) International Finance

Law 3205 – (4) International Law II

 

* Elective Courses

IR  3209 – (3) International Relations in Middle East II

IR 3210 – (3 ) Environmental Issues

Geog 3002 – (3) Elements of Political Geography II

*A student must choose any one elective course offered by the Department of International Relations and Geography

 

IR 3206     Contemporary US Foreign Policy

Course Description

The prominent role of the United States and a global leader makes examining and understanding the actions that the U.S. takes toward the rest of the world and how these decisions are made important for both American and citizens of other nations alike. This course will explain and examine the contemporary United States foreign policy. It also aims to analyze history, theory, and perspectives on foreign policy issues to provide the student with a foundation for understanding the study of foreign policy and perspectives.  In general, the foreign policy of the United States includes policy decisions regarding international issues and relationships with foreign countries.

Learning Outcomes

            At the end of the semester, the student will be able

  • to understand contemporary issues in the United States foreign policy
  • to predict and prescribe for the future of the US (eg, What policies should the U.S. adopt toward current problems and crises?)
  • to study how the United States’ relationship with the world has changed over time and how world events and U.S. foreign policy have mutually influenced one another.

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two or one hours will be devoted to tutorials and discussions.

Grading

Class Room Activities            35  marks (Attendance, Tutorial, Assignment, Discussions and Presentation)

Final Exam Paper                    65 marks

 

Tutorials, Mini-tests and Presentations

Tutorials will be a range of actives and will aim to increase student’s understanding of the weekly readings and key concepts. In addition, tutorials will build student’s practical skill.

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

 

IR  3207     European Union                                                                                

Course Description

The course aims to explore the creation of new structure in Europe after the Second World War which involves in integration process of three broad areas: military, political and economic union. The course will explain major institutions of European Union and policy-making and law-making processes. The course will also review border management strategy in Europe and Beyond Brexit in the EU.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • To analyze the dominant role of European integration ideas around the world
  • to examine the economic and political importance of European Union as a group
  • to differentiate main functions of EU institutions

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures.

Readings

There are articles and textbook chapters assigned each week which will be provided on handouts.

Grading

Attendance and Presentations                                                            35 marks

Final Exam                                                                              65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The Final exam will be comprehensive (i.e.., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and interactive discussion in group presentations.  Term paper will be included in 35% of the students’ overall final grade.

 

IR 3208   Myanmar Foreign Relations since 1948

Course Description

Foreign policy is the actions of government officials designed to promote national interests beyond a country’s territorial boundaries. The study of foreign policy and relations is an ever-changing story of how states, institutions and people engage with one another within a dynamic international system. This class will explore the nature of foreign policy and analyze the factors which determine the formulation of the foreign policy. Then, the course illustrates Myanmar’s foreign relations in regional and global context and emphasize how Myanmar maintains friendly ties with all the countries of the world since 1948.

Learning Outcomes

  At the end of the course, the students will able:

  • to understand the factors which determine the formulation of the foreign policy
  • to interpret political, economic and social cooperation may bring about more cordial and close relations between neighbors
  • to analyze the pull and push factors may affect relations between Myanmar and its counterpart countries, the cools and even strained

 

Class organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures.

Grading

Class Work (presentation, assignments, attendance)                                  35 marks

Final Exam                                                                                          65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

*Elective Course (Major)

IR-3209       International Relations in Middle East II

Course Description

This lecture aims to understand the students about the past and present situations of Middle East and how to solve the various problem of the Middle East from the United Nations and other superpower countries. What are some conflicts in Middle East? Why did great powers want to influence in Middle East? Is the United Nations effective in keeping peace in Middle East?

 

Learning outcomes

After finishing the lectures, students will become

-to know the various organizations in Middle East,

-to analyze the previous issues in Middle East and

-to settle the current affairs in Middle East for future peace process.

 

Class Organization

The Course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be classwork.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment, quiz)                     35 marks

Final Exam paper                                                       65 marks

 

 Final Exam

There will be final exam in week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive ( i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial, discussion, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

* Elective Course (Minor)

IR 3004 Current issues in International Relations (Law)

 

Course Description

This course will discuss political, security, economic and environmental issues of the world. Firstly, this course will cover political and security issues in the world such as the security cooperation among the US, Japan and India, Russia’s interest in the Arctic Region. Secondly, this module will examine the process of economic issues such as China’s Belt and Road Initiative, US-China trade conflict and economic tension between Japan and South Korea. Thirdly, this course will explore the environmental issues in current international relations such as global warming.

Learning Outcomes

The students will be able to analyze the situations of the international community, to identify the basic concept within and between states in the current issues of International Relations. The students will have the knowledge and skills to have a broad understanding of some of the most important ideas, issues and events in international relations.

Class organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures.

Grading

Classwork (assignment, tutorial and presentation)                 35 marks

Final Exam                                                                              65 marks

 

Final Exam

There will be a final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities, attendance will be worth 35 of the student’s overall final grade.

B.A (HONS) Second Year ( IR Specialization ) SEMESTER I

Core Courses

IR 4201 – (4) Diplomacy I

IR 4202 – (4) IR of Southeast Asia

IR 4203 – (4) International Relations Theories

Eco 4001- (4) International Trade Policy and Issues

Law 4202 – (4) Administrative Law

Elective Courses

IR 4204 – (3) Governments and Politics of East Asia

IR 4205- (3) Myanmar-China Relations

A student must submit a research paper as a requirement for the degree of BA.

 

IR 4201              Diplomacy I

Course Description

This course aims to contribute the students for understanding the significance of diplomacy in international relations. It aims to focus on the evolution of diplomacy since civilization, role and functions of diplomacy in international relations.  Diplomatic immunities, Cold War diplomacy, diplomacy in the 21st century, functions of diplomatic mission and Ministry of Foreign Affairs will be studied in the course. Students will engage in group discussion, paper assignment and paper presentation for widening of their knowledge on diplomacy and quality of diplomat in international relations.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to understand the changing trends of diplomacy in international relations
  • to analyze the diplomacy of small powers and major powers for achieving their interests
  • to enhance their knowledge on comprehensive role and functions of diplomacy in the 21st century

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks.  In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be assigned for group discussion and paper presentation.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment)               35

Final Exam paper                                                65

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 % of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, tutorials, assignments and their participation in group presentation in tutorial time. All class activities and attendance will be worth 35 % of the students overall final grade.

 

IR 4202           International Relations of Southeast Asia

Course Description

This class aims to familiarize students with the knowledge of the security and dynamics of international relations in Southeast Asia since the end of World War II. Firstly, this module will cover the development of Southeast Asia regionalism such as imaging Southeast Asia as a region, theoretical perspectives of IR in Asia, and the situation of Southeast Asia in the Cold War and Post-Cold War era. Next, this course will explore the role of such external powers as the United States, China, Australia, Japan, and India in Southeast Asia. Thirdly, this course will cover current regional challenges in building the ASEAN Community. Throughout the course, we will engage seminar discussions to evaluate the regionalism and regional cooperation in Southeast Asia and how ASEAN and its members have coped with several security challenges, and managed regional order and stability.

 

Learning outcomes

At the end of the semester, the student will be able

  • to understand the development of Southeast Asian regionalism,
  • to get familiar with the main Theoretical Perspectives of IR in Asia,
  • to analyze the situation of SEA in the Cold War and Post-Cold War era,
  • to identify and analyze the role of external powers in Southeast Asia, and
  • to analyze current regional challenges in building the ASEAN Community.

Class organization

The course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be classwork.

 Grading

Classwork (Presentation, Assignment, quiz)                          35%

Final Exam Paper                                                                    65%

 

Final Exam

There will be a final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall grade course.

Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, quiz, tutorial, and for their participation in discussions, involving group presentation in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students’ overall final grade.

 

IR 4203              Theories of International Relations

 

Course Description

This course aims to analyze the important theories of International Relations. It will include four different types of International Relations theories such as Realism, Liberalism, Radicalism and Constructivism. The description on how to apply these theories in the issues of International Relations will also be presented.

Learning Outcomes

 After ending the course, the students will assess

– to understand the basic concepts of theories of International Relations

– to criticize the differences of the Realism, Liberalism, Radicalism and Constructivism

– to explore the important of application of the International Relations Theories

 

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. Three hours will be taken for the lecture time and two hours will be had for other class activities during each week.

Grading:

Exam Marks                                                                                        65 marks

Class activity (attendance, discussion and assignment, etc.)              35 marks

 

Final Exam

After ending the semester, all course descriptions will be completed for the final exam which is worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Class participation (attendance, tutorial, discussion, presentation and assignment) is important for a student. Grade will be depended on the student’s activities. Plagiarism is strongly limited in the paper.

 

IR 4204     Governments and Politics of East Asia

Course Description

This course aims to provide the students with clear understanding of politics and governments of East Asians countries as well as some issues between and among them. In addition, it also aims the students at learning how these countries try to solve their issues and how to interact with one another and what the United States’ policy towards East Asia and Pacific will be explored as well. In this sense, we’d like to focus on the politics and governments of only four countries: Japan, two Korea and China although the East Asian region is made up of eight countries.

 

Learning outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to analyze comparatively the democratic politics of Japan and South Korea,
  • to think about correlation between political system and economic development,
  • to understand China’s foreign and security policy in East Asia

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be classwork

 

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment, tutorial)              35

Final Exam paper                                                            65

 

Final Exam      

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

 Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

IR-4205                      Myanmar-China Relations

 

Course Description

This course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of the situations of Myanmar-China Relations as a way of analysing Myanmar and China politics. Student will examine various determinant factors which influence and determine the Myanmar-China Relations. This course will provide students with critical thinking of various the dimensions, obstacles and opportunities in Myanmar-China Relations.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to interpret the concept of Myanmar’s geopolitical situation
  • to access China’s foreign policy and Myanmar’s foreign policy
  • to examine the various dimensions of Myanmar-China Relations
  • to analyse the challenges and opportunities of Myanmar-China Relations in the 21st

Class organisation

This course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, two hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be devoted to tutorials.

 

Grading

Attendance and Presentations                                                35%

Final Exam                                                                  65%

 

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

 

B.A (HONS) Second Year ( IR Specialization ) SEMESTER II

Core Courses

IR 4206 – (4) Diplomacy II

IR 4207 – (4) ASEAN

IR 4208 – (4) United Nations

Eco 4002- (4) Economic Development of Myanmar

Law 4204 – (4) International Human Rights Law

Elective Courses

IR 4209 – (3) Governments and Politics of South Asia

IR 4210 – (3) Myanmar-India Relations

A student must submit a research paper as a requirement for the degree of BA.

 

IR 4206              Diplomacy II

Course Description

This course aims to contribute the students for understanding the significance of diplomacy in international relations. It aims to focus on the art of negotiation and the instruments of foreign policy in international relations. The necessary arrangements for pre- negotiation and negotiation stages, difficulties and limitations for achieving the successful negotiations and the significant role of military strength and economic wealth in foreign policy formulation will be examined in the course. Students will engage in group discussion, paper assignment and paper presentation for widening of their knowledge on negotiation and international relations.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to understand the problems and approaches for achieving a successful negotiation
  • to analyze the instruments of foreign policy formulation with IR theories
  • to promote the negotiation skills in dealing with their social and working environment

 

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks.  In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be class work.

 

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment)               35

Final Exam paper                                                65

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, tutorials, assignments and their participation in group presentation in tutorial time. All class activities and attendance will be worth 35 % of the students overall final grade.

 

IR 4207                       ASEAN

 

Course Description

On regards with studying ASEAN, most of the students in Myanmar has developed a perception that ASEAN is a mere “Talk shop” or ASEAN is a semi-EU international institution. The reason is mainly because to understand ASEAN, it is to look from a new lens which is not the lens of Realism, through power or the lens of Liberalism, which is through benefits from cooperation, but from the lens of Constructivism, which emphasize on the reason why ASEAN came together and How they can build a Unity among diversity.

 

Learning Outcomes

 After ending the course, the students will assess

– to understand the basic concepts of the ASEAN

– to criticize the non-interference principle of ASEAN

– to develop a theoretical concept on the progress of ASEAN

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. Three hours will be taken for the lecture time and two hours will be had for other class activities during each week.

 

Grading

Exam Marks                                                                                        65 marks

Class activity (attendance, discussion and assignment, etc.)              35 marks

 

Final Exam

After ending the semester, all course descriptions will be completed for the final exam which is worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Class participation (attendance, tutorial, discussion, presentation and assignment) is important for a student. Grade will be depended on the student’s activities. Plagiarism is strongly limited in the paper.

 

IR 4208                       The United Nations

Course Description

IR 4108 is a course that students will study about the history of the United Nations, its structure, main bodies and agencies and also challenges and opportunities that the UN faces in the 21st century. It also introduces students to the academic discussion about the role of the UN in the contemporary world politics. In this course students will examine the strength and weakness of UN in place of overcoming the global challenges. Moreover, students will consider that how does UN response to the pressure of globalization, and whether UN’s performances are converging with those of the Great Power countries and then can determine the positions of Great Powers in the international affairs. In addition, students are expected to be familiar with central theories of international relations regarding the UN and can also understand the unique position of the UN system in the world politics.

Learning Outcomes

By learning this course, the students will be able

– to understand the role of the United Nations in global politics

– to examine the achievements and weakness of UN’s performance in global challenges

– to criticize the impacts of UN’s intervention over some countries

 Class Organization

This course is divided into sixteen weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be group discussion.

 

Grading

Tutorials                                                          10%

Group Presentation & Assignment                 25%

Final Exam                                                      65%

 

Final Exam

The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e, it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade. The exam will include materials from lectures, tutorials and discussion topics.

Presentation and TutorialsGroups will be formed based on students’ portion and assigned topics for presentation. The presentation topics are based on course readings and outside research. Tutorials will include a range of lectures and will aim to increase student’s understanding of the weekly readings and key concepts. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

IR 4109           Governments and Politics of South Asia

Course Description

The aims of this course are to provide the students with clear understanding of politics and governments of South Asian countries as well as some issues between and among them. In addition, it also aims the students at learning how these countries try to establish their governments and politics and how to interact with one another will be explored as well. In this sense, we’d like to focus on the politics and governments of only Four countries: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka although the South Asian region is made up of eight countries.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to realize about good governance as prerequisite for rapid growth and sustained economic development,
  • to help them think critically about democratic politics,
  • to assess what is the best political system for their country

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be classwork.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment, tutorial)                   35

Final Exam paper                                                                 65

 

Final Exam   

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

IR-4210                      Myanmar-India Relations

 

Course Description

This course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of the situations of Myanmar-India Relations as a way of analysing Myanmar and India politics. Students will explore the importance of Myanmar-India Relations to implement the Indo-Pacific strategy. Student will examine various determinant factors which influence and determine the Myanmar-India Relations. This course will provide students with critical thinking of various the dimensions, obstacles and opportunities in Myanmar-India Relations.

 

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to interpret the concept of Myanmar’s geopolitical situation
  • to access India’s foreign policy and Myanmar’s foreign policy
  • to examine the various dimensions of India-Myanmar Relations
  • to analyse the challenges and opportunities of India-Myanmar Relations under the Indo-Pacific strategy

Class organisation

This course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, two hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be devoted to tutorials.

Grading

Attendance and Presentations                                    35%

Final Exam                                                      65%

 

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

B.A (HONS & MA(Q)) Third Year ( IR Specialization ) SEMESTER I

IR – 5101/5201         Conflict Management and Conflict Resolution I 

 

Course Description

The course aims to introduce conceptual framework on conflict management and resolution, and role of states, and non-state actors  in conflict resolution .It also aims to provide students with an understanding of theory and practical cases to highlight nature of solutions of international conflicts.

 Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, students will be able

  • to understand theoretical perspectives on conflict management and resolution
  • to analyze basic causes of conflict
  • to identify approaches in conflict resolution with cases

 Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week three hours will be for interactive lectures and two hours will be class works.

 Grading

Classwork (Attendance, assignment, Quiz) –   35%

Final exam                          –    65% (Closed Book)

 

Final Exam

The final exam will cover 65% of the overall course grade and will be held in Week 16. It will be a comprehensive exam covering the entire semester. It will be a closed book exam.

 Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance, quiz, and assignment for 35% of the course grade. The assignment will include a group presentation and paper.

 

 IR-5101/5201 Geopolitics and International Relations I

Description of the course

Geopolitics, traditionally the study of power relations across geographic space, has transformed to embrace the cyber domain and the geopolitics of sustainability. Critical issue areas such as the geopolitical impacts of climate change and resource competition are studied alongside enduring classical themes, notably sea power and the return of great power rivalry. The geo-strategies employed by global and regional actors, including China, the United States, and Russia across global regions, are examined through the lens of geopolitical theory. This analytical approach is accompanied by historical and regional-cultural contexts, providing students with knowledge and understanding of the dynamics of contemporary geopolitical challenges.

 

Learning Outcomes

After completing the module successfully, the students will be able to have the following competences:

  • Becoming familiar with socio-economic, political, and environmental processes in contemporary global political issues;
  • Using key social science and geographic concepts to analyze the processes which shape and reshape these issues;
  • Thinking critically about contemporary global political issues and explore how to handle them from the perspective of IR;
  • Understanding of central geopolitical perspectives for dimensions in disaster situations

 

Teaching Methodology

The cause is taught with four specific teaching methods: lecturing, group discussions in the class, contributing tutorial tests and presentations. The course combines with 14 lecturers (2 hours for each lecture) in one semester. Main concepts and certain geopolitical theories are basically emphasized in each lecture.

Assessment

Class work (tutorials, group presentations, assignments) – 25%

Attendance                                    – 10%

Exam paper                                    _ 65%

Total                                         – 100%

 

IR – 5104/5204 National Security and Human Security I

 

Course description

 

The course is divided into  four parts. The first part deals with the major theories of international relations and their theoretical perceptions on security. The second parts focuses on the collective security involving the study of the regional and international security organizations. The third parts explores the security paradigm shift and non-traditional security issues. Finally, the course concludes with the study of human security.

 

Class Organization

These four parts will be covered within the sixteen weeks lecturers. Each week will involve: 3 hours lecture and 2 hours discussion.

 Learning Outcomes

  This course  explores  the security studies through two different domains: national security and human security. It will take theoretical understanding of the security to examine how the actors and institutions have been working in the international relations.  It will consider the changing pattern of security studies and the significant of people-centered security approach. The students will be expected to gain a better understanding on the security studies through different theoretical perspectives at the end of the semester.

 

Materials: “Paul D. Williams. ‘Security Studies: An Introduction’, Security Studies: An Introduction. London: Routledge (2013) “ will be the major reading for every week. Other relevant readings such as articles will be  provided for every week.

Assessments:

  1. Article review: 20% (Students have to submit weekly article review)
  2. Multiple Choice Exam: 15% ( this assessment will be done after week 14 lecture)
  3. Exam: 65%

B.A (HONS & MA(Q)) Third Year ( IR Specialization ) SEMESTER II

IR 5105/ 5205-Conflict Management and Conflict Resolution II

 

Course Description

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of  models of conflict resolution ,  mediation, and nature of international conflicts .It also aims to examine  strategies of mediation and international conflict resolution with practical cases.

 

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, students will be able

  • to understand models of international conflict resolution
  • to distinguish tension, disputes and conflict in international relations
  • to identify strategies of mediation with cases

 

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week three hours will be for interactive lectures and two hours will be class works.

 Grading

Classwork (Attendance, assignment, Quiz) –   35%

Final exam                          –   65% (Closed Book)

 

Final Exam

The final exam will be in week 16 and will cover 65% of the overall course grade. It will be a comprehensive exam covering the entire semester. It will be a closed book exam.

Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance, quiz, and assignment for 35% of the course grade. The assignment will include a group presentation and paper.

 

IR- 5107/5207 Geopolitics and International Relations II

 

Course Description and Objectives

Generally, Geopolitics is a broad spectrum of studying the geographic perspective to aid in understanding the dynamics of contemporary global politics, including issues related to global power struggles, nationalist conflicts, border dynamics, the global military actions over terrorism, peace movements, resource conflicts, and the politics of climate change. This course aims to provide the students with a greater understanding of the subdivision of the international politics called “geopolitics”, how it works, how it can be used to assess the capabilities of a state, a region, or a union of states in terms of their domestic and foreign policy orientations in international relations. In this course, different aspects of the geopolitical approach will be analysed the changing context of geographical, cultural, and political divergent.

 Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, the students are expected to have a greater knowledge on how to assess geopolitical issues, improve their understanding of foreign policy and international system analyses. It is also hoped that students will have a firm grasp of conceptual & theoretical explorations of the core concepts of strategy and related debates and controversies from a global perspective based on their sound knowledge and understanding. Moreover, they are able to analyze the geopolitical principles and strategies within the international relations system with well-developed judgement.

 

Teaching Methodology

The cause is taught with four specific teaching methods: lecturing, group discussions in the class, contributing tutorial tests and presentations. The course combines with 14 lecturers (2 hours for each lecture) in one semester. Main concepts and certain geopolitical theories are basically emphasized in each lecture.

Assessment

Class work (tutorials, group presentations, assignments) – 25%

Attendance                                    – 10%

Exam paper                                    _ 65%

Total                                         – 100%

 

IR 5108/5208- National Security and Human Security II

 

Course description

The course is divided into three parts. The first part explores the meaning of national security in relation to the nature of the state, the nature of threats and individual security. The second parts focuses on developing a national security policy. The third parts aims to study human security.

Class Organization

These three parts will be covered within the sixteen weeks lecturers. Each week will involve: 3 hours lecture and 2 hours discussion.

 Objectives and learning outcomes

This course aims to improve students’ in depth understanding on security and its components and at the end of the semester, students are expected to gain the knowledge of national security and human security from various aspects.

Materials:  “People, States and Fear: The National Security Problem in International Relations” by Barry Buzan and  other relevant readings such as articles will be  provided for every week.

Assessments:

  1. Policy Brief ( Defense White Paper): 15% ( Students will have to submit the policy brief on Myanmar Defense White Paper)
  2. Major Essay: 20% ( 1500 words essay will have to be submitted before the exam)
  3. Exam: 65%

B.A Fourth Year (Semester I)

Core Courses

IR 4101 – (4) Diplomacy I

IR 4102 – (4) Research Design & Method

IR 4103 – (4) International Relations Theories

Eco 4001- (4) International Trade Policy and Issues

Law 4002 – (4) Administrative Law

Elective Courses

IR 4104 – (3) Governments and Politics of East Asia

IR 4105- (3) Myanmar-China Relations

A student must submit a research paper as a requirement for the degree of BA.

 

IR 4101             Diplomacy I

Course Description

This course aims to contribute the students for understanding the significance of diplomacy in international relations. It aims to focus on the evolution of diplomacy since civilization, role and functions of diplomacy in international relations.  Diplomatic immunities, Cold War diplomacy, diplomacy in the 21st century, Functions of diplomatic mission and Ministry of Foreign Affairs will be studied in the course. Students will engage in group discussion, paper assignment and paper presentation for widening of their knowledge on diplomacy and quality of diplomat in international relations.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to understand the changing trends of diplomacy in international relations
  • to analyze the diplomacy of small powers and major powers for achieving their interests
  • to enhance their knowledge on comprehensive role and functions of diplomacy in 21st century

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks.  In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be assigned for group discussion and paper presentation.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment)            35

Final Exam paper                                            65

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 % of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, tutorials, assignments and their participation in group presentation in tutorial time. All class activities and attendance will be worth 35 % of the students overall final grade.

 

IR 4103                       Theories of International Relations

Course Description

This course aims to analyze the important theories of International Relations. It will include four different types of International Relations theories such as Realism, Liberalism, Radicalism and Constructivism. The description on how to apply these theories in the issues of International Relations will also be presented.

Learning Outcomes

 After ending the course, the students will assess

– to understand the basic concepts of theories of International Relations

– to criticize the differences of the Realism, Liberalism, Radicalism and Constructivism

– to explore the important of application of the International Relations Theories

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. Three hours will be taken for the lecture time and two hours will be had for other class activities during each week.

Grading:

Exam Marks                                                                                       65 marks

Class activity (attendance, discussion and assignment, etc.)                         35 marks

 

Final Exam

After ending the semester, all course descriptions will be completed for the final exam which is worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Class participation (attendance, tutorial, discussion, presentation and assignment) is important for a student. Grade will be depended on the student’s activities. Plagiarism is strongly limited in the paper.

 

IR 4104     Governments and Politics of East Asia

Course Description

This course aims to provide the students with clear understanding of politics and governments of East Asians countries as well as some issues between and among them. In addition, it also aims the students at learning how these countries try to solve their issues and how to interact with one another and what the United States’ policy towards East Asia and Pacific will be explored as well. In this sense, we’d like to focus on the politics and governments of only four countries: Japan, two Korea and China although the East Asian region is made up of eight countries.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to analyze comparatively the democratic politics of Japan and South Korea,
  • to think about correlation between political system and economic development,
  • to understand China’s foreign and security policy in East Asia

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be classwork

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment, tutorial)              35

Final Exam paper                                                            65

 

Final Exam      

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

IR-4105                     Myanmar-China Relations

 

Course Description

This course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of the situations of Myanmar-China Relations as a way of analysing Myanmar and China politics. Student will examine various determinant factors which influence and determine the Myanmar-China Relations. This course will provide students with critical thinking of various the dimensions, obstacles and opportunities in Myanmar-China Relations.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to interpret the concept of Myanmar’s geopolitical situation
  • to access China’s foreign policy and Myanmar’s foreign policy
  • to examine the various dimensions of Myanmar-China Relations
  • to analyse the challenges and opportunities of Myanmar-China Relations in the 21st

Class organisation

This course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, two hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be devoted to tutorials.

Readings

Readings from a variety of sources will be available to students through the course. The main textbooks will be “In the name of Pauk-Paw: Myanmar’s China Policy since 1948”, by Maung Aung Myoe and Modern China- Myanmar Relations: Dilemmas of Mutual Dependence, by David I. Steinberg and Hongwei Fan. Chapters from the book of Myanmar: Reintegrating into the International Community will also be used.

Grading

Attendance and Presentations                                                35%

Final Exam                                                                 65%

 

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

 

B.A Fourth Year (Semester II)

Core Courses

IR 4106 – (4) Diplomacy II

IR 4107 – (4) ASEAN

IR 4108 – (4) United Nations

Eco 4002- (4) Economic Development of Myanmar

Law 4004 – (4) International Human Rights Law

Elective Courses

IR 4109 – (3) Governments and Politics of South Asia

IR 4110 – (3) Myanmar-India Relations

A student must submit a research paper as a requirement for the degree of BA.

 

IR 4106               Diplomacy II

Course Description

This course aims to contribute the students for understanding the significance of diplomacy in international relations. It aims to focus on the art of negotiation and the instruments of foreign policy in international relations. The necessary arrangements for pre- negotiation and negotiation stages, difficulties and limitations for achieving the successful negotiations and the significant role of military strength and economic wealth in foreign policy formulation will be examined in the course. Students will engage in group discussion, paper assignment and paper presentation for widening of their knowledge on negotiation and international relations.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to understand the problems and approaches for achieving a successful negotiation
  • to analyze the instruments of foreign policy formulation with IR theories
  • to promote the negotiation skills in dealing with their social and working environment

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks.  In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be class work.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment)             35

Final Exam paper                                             65

 

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade

Attendance and Presentation

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures, tutorials, assignments and their participation in group presentation in tutorial time. All class activities and attendance will be worth 35 % of the students overall final grade.

 

IR 4107                       ASEAN

 

Course Description

On regards with studying ASEAN, most of the students in Myanmar has developed a perception that ASEAN is a mere “Talk shop” or ASEAN is a semi-EU international institution. The reason is mainly because to understand ASEAN, it is to look from a new lens which is not the lens of Realism, through power or the lens of Liberalism, which is through benefits from cooperation, but from the lens of Constructivism, which emphasize on the reason why ASEAN came together and How they can build a Unity among diversity.

Learning Outcomes

 After ending the course, the students will assess

– to understand the basic concepts of the ASEAN

– to criticize the non-interference principle of ASEAN

– to develop a theoretical concept on the progress of ASEAN

Class Organization

This course is divided into 16 weeks. Three hours will be taken for the lecture time and two hours will be had for other class activities during each week.

Grading:

Exam Marks                                                                                       65 marks

Class activity (attendance, discussion and assignment, etc.)                        35 marks

 

Final Exam

After ending the semester, all course descriptions will be completed for the final exam which is worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentation

Class participation (attendance, tutorial, discussion, presentation and assignment) is important for a student. Grade will be depended on the student’s activities. Plagiarism is strongly limited in the paper.

 

IR 4108                              The United Nations

Course Description

IR 4108 is a course that students will study about the history of the United Nations, its structure, main bodies and agencies and also challenges and opportunities that the UN faces in the 21st century. It also introduces students to the academic discussion about the role of the UN in the contemporary world politics. In this course students will examine the strength and weakness of UN in place of overcoming the global challenges. Moreover, students will consider that how does UN response to the pressure of globalization, and whether UN’s performances are converging with those of the Great Power countries and then can determine the positions of Great Powers in the international affairs. In addition, students are expected to be familiar with central theories of international relations regarding the UN and can also understand the unique position of the UN system in the world politics.

Learning Outcomes

By learning this course, the students will be able

– to understand the role of the United Nations in global politics

– to examine the achievements and weakness of UN’s performance in global challenges

– to criticize the impacts of UN’s intervention over some countries

Class Organization

This course is divided into sixteen weeks. In each week, three hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be group discussion.

Grading

Tutorials                                                         10%

Group Presentation & Assignment                25%

Final Exam                                                     65%

 

Final Exam

The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e, it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade. The exam will include materials from lectures, tutorials and discussion topics.

Presentation and TutorialsGroups will be formed based on students’ portion and assigned topics for presentation. The presentation topics are based on course readings and outside research. Tutorials will include a range of lectures and will aim to increase student’s understanding of the weekly readings and key concepts. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

IR 4109           Governments and Politics of South Asia

Course Description

The aims of this course are to provide the students with clear understanding of politics and governments of South Asian countries as well as some issues between and among them. In addition, it also aims the students at learning how these countries try to establish their governments and politics and how to interact with one another will be explored as well. In this sense, we’d like to focus on the politics and governments of only Four countries: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka although the South Asian region is made up of eight countries.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to realize about good governance as prerequisite for rapid growth and sustained economic development,
  • to help them think critically about democratic politics,
  • to assess what is the best political system for their country

Class Organization

The course is divided into 16 weeks. In each week, 3 hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and 2 hours will be classwork.

Grading

Class work (presentation, assignment, tutorial)                   35

Final Exam paper                                                                 65

 

Final Exam   

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65 marks of the overall course grade.

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

 

IR-4110                      Myanmar-India Relations

 

Course Description

This course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of the situations of Myanmar-India Relations as a way of analysing Myanmar and India politics. Students will explore the importance of Myanmar-India Relations to implement the Indo-Pacific strategy. Student will examine various determinant factors which influence and determine the Myanmar-India Relations. This course will provide students with critical thinking of various the dimensions, obstacles and opportunities in Myanmar-India Relations.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, the students will be able

  • to interpret the concept of Myanmar’s geopolitical situation
  • to access India’s foreign policy and Myanmar’s foreign policy
  • to examine the various dimensions of India-Myanmar Relations
  • to analyse the challenges and opportunities of India-Myanmar Relations under the Indo-Pacific strategy

Class organisation

This course is divided into sixteen (16) weeks. In each week, two hours will be devoted to interactive lectures and two hours will be devoted to tutorials.

Readings

Readings from a variety of sources will be available to students through the course. The main textbooks will be India-Myanmar Relations: Changing Contours, by Rajiv Bhatia and India-Myanmar Relations: Historical Links to Contemporary Convergences, by Lipi Ghosh and other authors. The related Articles will also be used.

Grading

Attendance and Presentations                                    35%

Final Exam                                                     65%

 

Attendance and Presentations

Students will be assessed on their attendance in lectures and tutorials and for their participation in tutorial discussions, including group presentations in tutorial time. All tutorial activities and attendance will be worth 35% of the students overall final grade.

Final Exam

There will be final exam in Week 16. The final exam will be comprehensive (i.e., it will cover the entire semester) and be worth 65% of the overall course grade.

Modules for International Relations Specialization

(Master of Arts Degree)

 

IR (First Year)

Semester I

IR 611      International Relations of Asia Pacific I

IR 612     Major Issues in International Relations

IR 613     International Relations: Theories and Approaches

IR 614     International Political Economy I

Semester II

IR 621      International Relations of Asia Pacific II

IR 622     International Relations of Central Asia

IR 623     Globalization: Ecological Issues

IR 624     International Political Economy II

 

IR (Second Year)

Semester I

IR 631    Research Progress Report

IR 632   Research & Seminar

Semester II

Research

 

PS (First Year)

Semester I

Semester II

*Modules for Political Science specialization are being discussed.

 

PS (Second Year)

Semester I

Semester II

*Modules for Political Science specialization are being discussed.

 

Modules for International Relations Specialization

(PhD Preliminary Course)

 

Ph D

Preliminary

IR 711       Myanmar Foreign Policy

IR 712      United Nations and Myanmar

IR 713      Regional Development in Asia

IR 714      Treaties, Agreements & Conventions

Modules for Diploma in International Relations (DIR)

DIR

Semester I

D IR Module I      Elements of International Relations I

D IR Module II     Elements of Political Institutions  I

DIR Module III     Diplomacy I

D IR Module IV    Current Issues in  International Relations I

 

Semester II

D IR Module V     Elements of International Relations II

D IR Module VI     Elements of Political Institutions  II

DIR Module VII    Governments of Southeast Asia

D IR Module V III  Current Issues in  International Relations II

 

Modules for Diploma in Political Science (DPS)

Semester I

DPS  Module I      International Relations in Political Thought

DPS  Module II     Essentials of International Relations

DPS  Module III     Comparative Politics

DPS  Module IV    Public Administration

 

Semester II

DPS  Module V     Foreign Policy Formulation

DPS  Module VI    Elements of Political Institutions

DPS  Module VII    Comparative Politics

DPS  Module VIII   Public Policy