The University of Yangon started the Department of Archaeology on 1 July 1994. There was one head of the Department assisted by a staff of two Lecturers, two assistant Lecturers and three Tutors. All of them were recruited from the History Department. They had some knowledge of Prehistory and Protohistory but knew very little of archaeology and anthropology. The Department therefore had to depend largely on the Archaeology Department, Ministry of Culture and Geology Department, Geography Department, History Department, Law Department, Anthropology Department and Oriental Studies Department and retired personnel of Yangon Institute of Technology to teach-

1. Field Archaeology
2. Preservation, Conservation and Restoration of Monuments
3. Preservation and Conservation of structures and materials
4. Prehistoric Archaeology (Stone, Bronze and Iron Age)
5. Protohistoric Archaeology (especially in Pyu Period)
6. Buddhist Art and Architecture (Pyu and Bagan Period)
7. Colonial Period Structures
8. Environmental Archaeology
9. Antiquarian Law
10. Museology and
11. Cultural Heritage Management
The above subjects are very important in Myanmar’s Archaeology today.

Detail HistoryThe Department of Archaeology is about twenty-four years old. Faculty members want to become fully qualified teachers of the department but it is not entirely feasible yet. Several factors hamper this development. Among them are: lack of foreign degrees, lack of up to date knowledge, books and journals, the absence of modern scientific facilities, little familiarity with modern practical methodology for field research. Faculty members’ weakness in the English language is an additional major stumbling block.• Visiting Professor Programme
Open Society Foundations offered to fund an upgrade our Education with a Visiting Professor Programme in the early period of 2012. We chose six Visiting Professors to instruct us in Field Archaeology, Conservation and Restoration of Monuments, Protohistoric Archaeology (especially in Pyu Period), Buddhist Art and Architecture (Pyu and Bagan Periods), Colonial Period Structures and Cultural Heritage Management supported by OSF for the Academic Year 2012-2013.We benefited greatly from the Open Society Foundations’ support, in the following areas:
1. Teaching Methods: using power point presentation and reference books for all lectures; The importance of the lecturer and students discussing issues openly together after a lecture; encouraging critical and conceptual thinking about archaeological practice and research.2. Research Methodology: an in-depth understanding of approaches to the collection, analysis and interpretation of archaeological data to support detailed study at the forefront of archaeological knowledge.3. Field Training:
practical methodology in Field Archaeology. We developed critical faculties in discussion, debate, and evaluation of alternative perspectives on and interpretations of archaeological data in the field.
The Visiting Professor programme strengthened the professional capacities of faculty members. Faculty members would now like to study abroad in other Universities to do joint research work, to attend conferences and workshops. Students and Staff exchange programmes are also needed in our Department; we need training in practical Methodology, research Methodology and teaching Methodology, how to manage our Cultural Heritage and how to design the Curriculum.Current SituationNow our department has twenty-two faculty members; one Professor, two Associate Professors, ten Lecturers, seven Assistant Lecturers and two Tutors.

All Faculty members of the Archaeology Department now have a Master’s Degree or PhD degree in Archaeology. There is also an effort to insure an availability of a good library on subjects broadly related to archaeology, and a small laboratory to identify the artifacts unearthed in excavations. We feel that we need some training for preservation and conservation of the Museum’s materials.

We have collected a fairly large number of potsherds, finger marked bricks and baked bricks with paddy husk in them. There is also pottery of various types, styles and usage. Clay pipes are found in the thousands. We need people who are trained in Thermo luminescence dating. Human skeletons were unearthed from archaeological sites and they need to be radiocarbon dated. Some of us should be trained to do that. Dendrochronology, pollen and fauna analysis are also specialized subjects in which we need training.

In conclusion, faculty members know something about the archaeological subjects but they need further in-depth training in some subjects. The Department of Archaeology needs long term assistance from, and exposure to, international Universities.

We aim to reach an Asian Universities’ standard level after four or five years. The final goal will be a Western Universities’ standard after ten years. We still have a long way to go to become a world-class institution to provide the knowledge and understanding that the deep, long and unique history of Myanmar deserves.

We have an ambition to maintain a Museum of Archaeology in the Department and we need some training in Museology. The department has a small Museum that is in its initial stages. What we want is a fairly good-sized Museum that would help us in identifying the artifacts that we have collected from archaeological sites. They could be used as teaching resources. They need to be identified by the technique used to manufacture them. After having done these preliminary studies, we have to do some preservation and conservation. We feel that we need some training for preservation and conservation of these artifacts and how to display and how to catalogue these artifacts in the Museum.
Currently our museum is a storeroom for the existing collection. Each year, students add to the collection through objects found during excavations. The collection has minimal documentation of display rationale and as such is of little use as a teaching resource. Our aim of the collaboration project is to develop a standardized documentation regime, and a suitable display format. The collaboration would involve staff and student participation in international best practice documentation processes. Museum display techniques and basic training in museology would be delivered through participatory workshops.

Preliminary discussions were held with the Australian National University (ANU) in March 2015for the development of a Museum of Archaeology at the University of Yangon. ANU agreed to support the proposal.

အဆင့္ျမင့္ ပညာဦးစီးဌာန လုပ္ငန္းညွိနွိုင္း အစည္းအေဝးက်င္းပ

ပညာေရးဝန္ႀကီးဌာန၊ အဆင့္ျမင့္ပညာစီးဌာန၊ တကၠသိုလ္မ်ား၊ ဒီဂရီေကာလိပ္မ်ား၊ ေကာလိပ္မ်ား၏

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အျပည္ျပည္ဆိုင္ရာ ဇီဝမ်ိဳးစုံမ်ိဳးကြဲေန႔

ႏွစ္စဥ္ ေမလ ၂၂ ရက္ေန႔သည္ အျပည္ျပည္ဆိုင္ရာ

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Dr. Aye AyeOo Associate Professor

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Dr. Kyaw Myo Satt Lecturer

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Dr. Bo Bo Kyaw Lecturer

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Daw Sabai Win Lecturer

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Daw Wynn Yee Hla Lecturer

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DawThorda Win Lecturer

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DawThidaNyein Lecturer

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Daw Khin Than Aye Lecturer

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Dr. Ye’ Tun Lecturer

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U Soe Min Aung Lecturer

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Daw Aye Aye Moe Lecturer

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U Tin Htut Aung Assistant Lecturer

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Dr. May Su Ko Assistant Lecturer

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U Saw Tun Lin Assistant Lecturer

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Daw Naing Naing Lay Maw Assistant Lecturer

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Daw Khin Phyu Phyu Tun Assistant Lecturer

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Daw KhinThet Su Hlaing Tutor

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Daw Thaw Thaw Nyein San Tutor

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International Collaboration on Archaeological Research

  1. Myanmar Ceramics Symposium Myanmar Academy of Arts and Science (MAAS), Archaeology Unit, ISEAS, National University of Singapore, Archaeology Department of Yangon University and Myanmar Ceramic Society (MCS)

– Arts Hall, UY (March 2014) Three UY staff and two post graduate students participated

  1. Museum Management and Teaching Technique Australian National University (Dr. Charlotte Galloway)

– Archaeology Department Museum, UY (2015, 2016 and   2017)

Staff and postgraduate students from the Archaeology Departments of Yangon and Dagon universities participated

  1. The East-West Cultural Corridor in Mainland Southeast Asia, Joint Research with Kyoto University and Centre of Southeast Asia, Bangkok, (Prof. Mamoru Shibayama)

– Started in 2015; 1 staff member participated

  1. Myanmar-Singapore Archaeological Training Project (Pottery Analysis) National University Of Singapore (Prof. John Miksic and Prof. Goh Geok Yian)

– Bagan Archaeological Museum (January 2016)

– Bagan Archaeological Museum (May 2016)

– Bagan Archaeological Museum (December 2016)

– Bagan Archaeological Museum (March 2017)

Eight undergraduate students participated

  1. Prehistoric Archaeology Research (Stone Age) University of Wollongong (Prof. Ben Marwick), Australia

– Badahlin Cave (excavation) (February 2016)

– Chauk Oil Field (excavation)(June 2016)

– Dawei area (excavation)(November 2017)

Two members of staff participated

  1. Celadon Bowls from the Excavation of Kaw Tar Kiln, Nara Cultural Properties Institute Team.

        – Kaw Tar, Kyaikmaraw Township, Mon State (February  2016)

– Kaw Tar, Kyaikmaraw Township, Mon State (February  2017)

– Kaw Tar, Kyaikmaraw Township, Mon State (February  2018)

(participated in one staff one postgrad student)

  1. Thai Cultural Camp (Cultural Relationship of Southeast Asian Countries) Prince of Songkal University

– Hat Yai City (July 2016)

(participated in two undergrad students)

  1. Intangible Cultural Heritage Courier of Asia and the Pacific, Youth Meets ICH, Intangible Cultural Heritage in the Asia-Pacific Region under the auspices of UNESCO (CHCAP)

– Inle Lake (traditional lotus weaving)  (August-December 2016)

Two staff members and four undergraduate students participated

 

Visiting Professors with Open Society Foundations’ support

  1. Franklin Haines Price

–  Maritime Archaeology in Florida, United States of America

–  Archaeology Department, UY (November 2016)

Staff from the Archaeology Department of Yangon and Dagon Universities and postgraduate students)

  1. Dr. Cristophe Munier Gaillard

–  on the classification of Myanmar Mural Styles (Nyaungyan and Konbaung styles)

        –  Thirteen lectures (12 December 2016 to 13 March 2017)

Staff from the Archaeology Department of Yangon and Dagon Universities and postgraduate students

  1. Dr. Lilian Handlin

– Buddhist Philosophy in Myanmar (Bagan Period)

–  Archaeology Department, UY (December 2016)

Staff from the Archaeology Department of Yangon and Dagon Universities and postgraduate students

 

  1. Research and Collaboration on Cultural Study in Southeast Asia, Teaching and Training withKyoto University, Southeast Asian Centre and Chulalongkorn University (Dr. Surat Lertlum and Prof. Jeerawan Sangpetch)

– Archaeology Department, UY (March 2017)

– Archaeology Department, UY and Sri ksetra (June 2017)

One staff member and ten undergraduate students participated)

1. Prehistoric Archaeology
2. Protohistoric Archaeology
3. Historical Archaeology
4. Colonial Period Archaeology
5. Environmental Archaeology
6. Cultural Heritage Management

  1. “Myanmar Ceramics Symposium”

(Myanmar Academy of Arts and Science (MAAS), Archaeology Unit ( ISEAS, National University of Singapore), Archaeology Department of Yangon University and Myanmar Ceramic Society (MCS)

– Arts Hall, UY (March 2014)

(participated in three staff and two post grade students)

  1. Museum Management and Teaching Technique

(Australian   National University) Dr. Charlotte Galloway

– Archaeology Department Museum, UY (2015, 2016 and   2017))

(participated in staff from Archaeology Department of        Yangon and Dagon and postgrad students)

Curriculum

  1.  Arch 1101 – Archaeological Theories I
  2.  Arch 1102 – Prehistoric Archaeology in Myanmar
  3.  Arch 1103 – Archaeological Theories II
  4.  Arch 1104 – Protohistoric and Early Historical Archaeology in Myanmar
  1. Arch 2101 – Archaeological Methods I
  2. Arch 2102 – Hindu Art and Architecture I
  3. Arch 2103 – Stone Tool Technology I
  4. Arch 2104 – Archaeological Methods II
  5. Arch 2105 – Hindu Art and Architecture II
  6. Arch 2106 – Stone Tool Technology II
  1. Arch 3101 – Buddhist Art and Architecture I
  2. Arch 3102 – Archaeological of Old World I
  3. Arch 3103 – Archaeology of Southeast Asia I
  4. Arch 3104 – Epigraphy in Myanmar
  5. Arch 3105 – Ceramic Archaeology I
  6. Arch 3106 – Preservation of Monuments
  7. Arch 3107 – Buddhist Art and Architecture II
  8. Arch 3108 – Archaeological of Old World II
  9. Arch 3109 – Archaeology of Southeast Asia II
  10. Arch 3110 – Protection and Preservation of Cultural Heritage
  11. Arch 3111 – Ceramic Archaeology II
  12. Arch 3112 – Dating Archaeological Evidences
  1. Arch 4101 – Indian Archaeology I
  2. Arch 4102 – Chinese Archaeology I
  3. Arch 4103 – Archaeology of New World I
  4. Arch 4104 – Numismatology
  5. Arch 4105 – European Civilization
  6. Arch 4106 – History of Archaeology in Myanmar
  7. Arch 4107 – Indian Archaeology II
  8. Arch 4108 – Chinese Archaeology II
  9. Arch 4109 – Archaeology of New World II
  10. Arch 4110 – Museology
  11. Arch 4111 – Civilization of Mesopotamia and Egypt
  12. Arch 4112 – History of World Archaeology
  1. Arch 3201 – Buddhist Art and Architecture I
  2. Arch 3202 – Archaeological of Old World I
  3. Arch 3203 – Archaeology of Southeast Asia I
  4. Arch 3204 – Epigraphy in Myanmar
  5. Arch 3205 – Ceramic Archaeology I
  6. Arch 3206 – Preservation of Monuments
  7. Arch 3207 – Buddhist Art and Architecture II
  8. Arch 3208 – Archaeological of Old World II
  9. Arch 3209 – Archaeology of Southeast Asia II
  10. Arch 3210 – Protection and Preservation of Cultural Heritage
  11. Arch 3211 – Ceramic Archaeology II
  1. Arch 4201 – Indian Archaeology I
  2. Arch 4202 – Chinese Archaeology I
  3. Arch 4203 – Archaeology of New World I
  4. Arch 4204 – Numismatology
  5. Arch 4205 – European Civilization
  6. Arch 4206 – History of Archaeology in Myanmar
  7. Arch 4207 – Indian Archaeology II
  8. Arch 4208 – Chinese Archaeology II
  9. Arch 4209 – Archaeology of New World II
  10. Arch 4210 – Museology
  11. Arch 4211 – Civilization of Mesopotamia and Egypt
  12. Arch 4212 – History of World Archaeology
  1. Arch 5201 – Anthropogogical Archaeology
  2. Arch 5202 – Preservation and Interpretation of Plant Remains
  3. Arch 5203 – Underwater Archaeology
  4. Arch 5204 – Cognitive Archaeology
  5. Arch 5205 – Archaeology of People I
  6. Arch 5206 – Archaeological Interpretation
  7. Arch 5207 – Cultural Evolution
  8. Arch 5208 – Archaeology of People II
  9. Arch 5209 – Environmental Archaeology
  10. Arch 5210 – Pottery in Myanmar
  11. Arch 5211 – Preservation and Interpretation of Animal Remains
  12. Arch 5212 – Social Archaeology
  1. Arch 5201 – Anthropological Archaeology
  2. Arch 5202 – Preservation and Interpretation of Plant Remains
  3. Arch 5203 – Underwater Archaeology
  4. Arch 5204 – Cognitive Archaeology
  5. Arch 5205 – Archaeology of People I
  6. Arch 5206 – Archaeological Interpretation
  7. Arch 5207 – Cultural Evolution
  8. Arch 5208 – Archaeology of People II
  9. Arch 5209 – Environmental Archaeology
  10. Arch 5210 – Pottery in Myanmar
  11. Arch 5211 – Preservation and Interpretation of Animal Remains
  12. Arch 5212 – Social Archaeology

MA

First Semester

  1. Arch 611 – Prehistoric Archaeology
  2. Arch 612 – Historical Archaeology
  3. Arch 613 – Field Archaeology
  4. Arch 614 – Dating Archaeological Evidences
  5. Arch 621 – Buddhist Art and Architecture
  6. Arch 622 – Research Methodology
  7. Arch 623 – Paleography
  8. Arch 624 – Conservation and Preservation of Archaeological Materials

MA

Second Year

  1. Arch 631 – Research Progress Report
  2. Arch 632 – Research and Seminar
  3. Arch 641 – Research and Seminar
  4. Arch 642 – Thesis and Viva Voce

Phd

  1. Arch 711 – Cultural Archaeology
  2. Arch 712 – Environmental Archaeology
  3. Arch 713 – Marine Archaeology
  4. Arch 714 – Prehistoric, Protohistoric and Early Historical Archaeology in Myanmar

Diploma

  1. D. Arch 111 A – Prehistoric Archaeology
  2. D. Arch 112 A – Exploration, Excavation and Publication
  3. D. Arch 113 A – Museum Method
  4. D. Arch 114 A – Preservation of Monuments
  5. D. Arch 111 B – Potohistoric and Early Historical Archaeology
  6. D. Arch 112 B – Chemical Preservation of Cultural Properties
  7. D. Arch 113 B – Protection of National Cultural Properties
  8. D. Arch 114 B – Palaeography and Numismatology